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Eckerd College
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St. Petersburg, FL 33711

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HUMAN EXPERIENCE

General Education

Catalog Description

HUMAN EXPERIENCE

All first year students are required to take the Human Experience two-course sequence, the cornerstone of Eckerd College's general education program. Through exploring core concepts and materials of the world's civilizations, these courses introduce students to the integration of knowledge and enduring questions central to a liberal arts education.

Human Experience will engage some of the influential works and ideas of Western civilization in a conversation with important works of non-Western civilizations. We will also listen to voices that have often gone unrecognized in traditional Western Civilization courses. What we envision is a journey through time that creates cross-cultural communication and allows students to consider alternatives to the received wisdom of their own culture.

Human Experience is an interdisciplinary course sequence, using lecture and discussion formats. The discussion sections are the same groups, with the same instructor/mentor, as the Autumn Term groups.

FD 181: Human Experience: Then and Now
This first course in general education, Human Experience: Then and Now, introduces students to the liberal arts by juxtaposing classic and modern works around enduring questions.

FD 182: Human Experience: Selves and Others
The second course in general education, Human Experience: Selves and Others, encourages students to consider significant cultural and social issues from a range of perspectives across time and cultures.

What is Human Experience?

Human Experience will engage some of the influential works and ideas of Western civilization in a conversation with important works of non-Western civilizations. We will also listen to voices that have often gone unrecognized in traditional Western Civilization courses. What we envision is a journey through time that creates cross-cultural communication and allows students to consider alternatives to the received wisdom of their own culture.