Western Heritage in a Global Context

General Education

Plagiarism

ECKERD COLLEGE HONOR PLEDGE

 On my honor, as an Eckerd College student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, or steal, nor to tolerate those behaviors in others.

 PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism consists of handing in as your work material written or created by someone else; whether by another student, a professional paper writer, a recognized expert, or anyone.  It is good scholarly form to indicate clearly the source of one’s ideas and information.  Any extended direct quotation from someone else’s writing must be enclosed in quotation marks and all quotations or paraphrases must be footnoted.  Submission as one’s own of a work of art created by someone else is also classified as plagiarism.

Cheating and plagiarism are offenses which strike at the heart of the academic community.  Decisions regarding guilt and penalties within the course will be made by the professor.  Violations which suggest penalties going beyond the limits of the course will be referred to the Dean of Faculty, who shall render a decision or make a referral to the appropriate committee.  The student shall have the right to appeal a decision by a professor to the Dean of Faculty and from the Dean of Faculty to an ad hoc appeal committee.

                                                                                  —EC Book: Community Handbook

Plagiarism, simply defined, is representing the words and/or ideas of others as if they were your own.  It is dishonest: it is theft.  Although only a small fraction of Eckerd students ever even contemplate committing plagiarism, even a few cases are sufficient to lower the morale of all students as well as that of the faculty.  Plagiarism by another student cheapens the quality of the degree for which you are working.

Plagiarism will not be tolerated.  The standard penalty for the first offense is failure in the course.  At the second offense, the offender is subject to dismissal from Eckerd College.

We need to be very clear about what constitutes plagiarism, how one can give credit for the sources of words, phrases, ideas, and how one can write about something he/she knows about only through reading, without relying upon too many direct quotations.

PLAGIARISM IS COPYING DIRECTLY FROM PRINTED MATERIAL WITHOUT USE OF QUOTATION MARKS

PLAGIARISM IS BORROWING THE PRINCIPAL IDEAS OR CONCEPTS OR ORGANIZING SCHEME OF ANOTHER SPEAKER OR WRITER WITHOUT GIVING THAT PERSON CREDIT.

PLAGIARISM IS USING EXCEPTIONAL IDEAS OF LECTURERS, TEACHERS, OR OTHER STUDENTS WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGING THE SOURCE.

PLAGIARISM IS USING THE SAME WRITTEN DOCUMENT (PAPER, JOURNAL, EXAM, ETC.) OR PORTIONS OF A PREVIOUSLY WRITTEN PAPER AS CREDIT IN MORE THAN ONE COURSE WITHOUT APPROVAL OF THE PROFESSORS.

In all of these cases, one can avoid plagiarism by 1) putting direct quotations (long or short) in quotation marks and giving credit to the source, by citing it in an accepted academic format; 2) by giving credit (naming the source) for material you have put into your own words; 3) by giving credit to the book or speaker whose ideas you are incorporating into your paper; and 4) by identifying the source of exceptional ideas with a signal phrase: “As someone suggested in class...,” or “Jane Doe had the idea that....”

Note: About once each year, we have the unpleasant task of informing a freshman that he/she has failed Western Heritage because of plagiarism.  This makes both us and the student involved quite unhappy and complicates his/her future academic career.  This syllabus article constitutes fair warning: you are responsible for knowing what plagiarism is and for not committing the offense.  If you do not clearly understand what plagiarism is, ask your mentor or other professors

What is WHGC?

Western Heritage in a Global Context (known as WHGC) will engage some of the influential works and ideas of Western civilization in a conversation with important works of non-Western civilizations. We will also listen to voices that have often gone unrecognized in traditional Western Civilization courses. What we envision is a journey through time that creates cross-cultural communication and allows students to consider alternatives to the received wisdom of their own culture.