Housing

Housing

Your Pet's Health

A healthy pet is a happy pet, check out the information below for your cat or dog.

Cat Vaccination Information

Some chick and her catFeline Distemper (Panleukopenia)

This is one of the most widespread feline viral diseases and is extremely contagious. Panleukopenia is most common in kittens under 6 months of age. It is spread by contact with an infected cat or by contact with infected bodily secretions (urine, blood, etc.). Signs of the disease usually develop 2-5 days after contracting it, and the duration of the illness ranges from 2-14 days. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, fever, loss of appetite, vomiting, dehydration, and depression. Many cats that contract the disease also show signs of secondary pneumonia due to a weakened immune system. A system of kitten vaccinations followed by a yearly booster is the best way to prevent the disease.

Feline Rhinotraheitis (FVR)

This is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is caused by a herpes virus that attacks a cat's eyes, nasal passages, and trachea. The disease is much more prevalent and serious in kittens. FVR is spread by contact with bodily discharges and contact with contaminated objects (infected animals are often place in quarantine). The infection is characterized by sneezing, loss of appetite, fever, and eye inflammation. Recovery usually occurs 1-3 weeks after infection. A system of kitten vaccinations followed by a yearly booster is the best way to prevent the disease.

Feline Calicivirus (FCV)

This is a viral disease that can occur only in cats. Calicivirus causes a mild to serious respiratory illness from being inhaled or swallowed. Signs of the disease usually develop within 2-10 days of infection, and include runny eyes and nose, sneezing, depression, poor appetite, and heavy drooling. Calicivirus usually lasts from 1-4 weeks. The best prevention is through a series of kitten vaccinations followed by a yearly booster.

Feline Pneumonitis

This is a third common respiratory illness found in cats and is caused by an organism related to Chlamydia. Its signs are again sneezing, fever, loss of appetite, nasal discharge, and inflamed eyes. It is contracted through contact with bodily discharges or inhalation. A system of kitten vaccinations followed by a yearly booster is again the best way to prevent the disease.

Feline Leukemia

This is a viral disease that can occur in several forms of severity. It is the most destructive feline virus and is highly contagious. It is spread by saliva (mating, grooming, fighting, etc.) as well as infected blood and urine contact. The infection can cause uncontrolled increase of the virus, leading to altered cells that cause tumors, destruction of blood cells, and dysfunction of the immune system. Some versions of the disease can become fatal over time. The only means of prevention of the disease are isolation (not allowing contact with other cats) and vaccination. A simple blood test can determine if the cat has this disease.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

This disease is the feline version of the HIV virus that people are exposed to. It is transmitted through blood, most commonly through cat bites. Cats with this disease generally do not live very long, but some forms of treatment to prolong life are available. Special care needs to be taken with FIV positive cats so that the virus does not spread. A simple blood test can test for the presence of the disease. Monitoring cat socialization and keeping cats indoors are the best means for preventing the spread of the disease. FIV cannot be spread to humans.

Rabies

This disease is caused by a virus that infects all warm-blooded animals. It is usually spread though animal bites when the saliva contains the virus. Rabies is very hard to detect when an animal is alive since only certain tissues respond to testing. Signs of the disease are change of behavior/temperament, restlessness, irregular eating, difficulty swallowing, increased drooling, fever, vicious behavior, paralysis, and convulsions. Death is the ultimate outcome. There is no treatment for animals with rabies, and once determined to be infected, they are euthanized. However, if they bite a human while infected, the animal is placed into quarantine for 10 days before euthanasia for human health reasons. Vaccination is the only effective way of preventing the disease.

Heartworm

Heartworm is a parasitic disease that effects numerous types of animals all throughout the world. It is spread through mosquito bites, where the mosquito spreads the parasitic larva to the mammal's bloodstream. Once the amount of larvae and worms in an animal's blood stream reaches a certain amount, the worms migrate towards the animal's heart. They can produce thousands of eggs per day and infest the right chambers of the heart, arteries in the lungs, as well as veins entering the liver and the heart. Coughing is the first sign of infection, which usually occurs about a year after contracting the parasite. Later signs include exhaustion, fainting, weakness, coughing up blood, difficulty breathing, and weight loss. Death is often the final outcome. Treatments are available for infected animals, but the best means of prevention is through heartworm preventive medicine (topically and orally administered) and yearly heartworm blood and fecal testing.

Dog Vaccination Information

Dog vaccine infoCanine Distemper

This is one of the most widespread canine diseases (rodents may also become infected). Canine distemper is a viral infection that is spread through the air and contaminated objects. It is more common in puppies and those with a weakened immune system. Signs of the disease include respiratory problems, runny nose and eyes, diarrhea, vomiting, and seizures. Recovered animals may experience muscle pain, and periodic convulsions. Distemper can be fatal. The best means of preventing the disease is through a series of puppy vaccinations beginning at 6-9 weeks of age, followed by a yearly booster.

Canine Hepatitis

This disease is an infectious viral disease. Hepatitis infects the liver, kidneys, lymph nodes, eyes, and other organs. Most dogs are exposed to hepatitis during their lifetime, and cases range from mild to fatal. Signs of the virus generally first appear a week after the virus is contracted and include fever, loss of appetite, increased thirst, tonsillitis, and reddening of the mouth, throat and eyes. Like other canine diseases, the most effective method of preventing hepatitis is through a series of puppy vaccinations followed by a yearly booster.

Canine Leptospirosis

This is a bacterial disease that infects dogs, humans, and other mammals. It is highly contagious and is found in many types. Each type of Leptospirosis is infectious to only certain animals. The bacteria attack kidneys, the liver, and nervous system, causing permanent damage. Leptospirosis is passed through contact with bodily secretions, especially in urine. It most commonly collects in pond or stagnant water. The best method of prevention is through a series of puppy vaccinations followed by a yearly booster.

Canine Parvovirus

This is another viral disease that can be contracted through infected feces and urine. The virus is able to live a long time outside of the host, thus making it very contagious. Puppies are most susceptible. Parvovirus causes severe bloody vomiting and diarrhea, dehydration, shock, and even death. The most effective way of preventing the disease is through a series of puppy vaccinations followed by a yearly booster.

Canine Parainfluenza

This is a canine disease that causes kennel cough. It is generally a mild respiratory infection in healthy dogs, but can be very severe in puppies and elderly dogs. Again, a series of puppy vaccinations followed by yearly boosters are the best means of prevention against Parainfluenza.

Canine Coronavirus

This is a highly contagious viral disease that infects the intestinal tract of dogs. It is spread through swallowing, most commonly through eating feces, and signs usually appear 1-5 days after contracting. Signs include depression, vomiting, dehydration, and diarrhea. The illness generally lasts 2-10 days, but can be fatal in puppies. A series of puppy vaccinations followed by a yearly booster is the best method for preventing Coronavirus.

Canine Bordetella

This disease is one of the main contributors to kennel cough. It can either be a sole bacterial infection or be in combination with distemper, adenovirus type-2 infection, parainfluenza, and other respiratory problems. Signs of the illness include a harsh, dry cough that is often followed by gagging and coughing up a foamy mucous. It is spread through inhalation or contact with contaminated surfaces. Since Bordetella is highly contagious, yearly and up-to-date vaccinations are required at many boarding, training, and grooming facilities. A yearly vaccine is the most effective means of prevention.

Lyme Disease

This is a bacterial disease that is also known as Borreliosis and can infect most animals. It is usually transmitted by nymphs of deer and mice ticks. The greatest threat of Lyme disease is during the summer months. Signs of the disease include a rash, fever, joint pain/swelling, and swollen lymph nodes. Treatment is very difficult and the disease can spread to humans. The best means of prevention is through vaccination. It is highly recommended that dogs that go into wooded areas during the summer be vaccinated against Lyme disease.

Rabies

This disease is caused by a virus that infects all warm-blooded animals. It is usually spread though animal bites when the saliva contains the virus. Rabies is very hard to detect when an animal is alive since only certain tissues respond to testing. Signs of the disease are change of behavior/temperament, restlessness, irregular eating, difficulty swallowing, increased drooling, fever, vicious behavior, paralysis, and convulsions. Death is the ultimate outcome. There is no treatment for animals with rabies, and once determined to be infected, they are euthanized. However, if they bite a human while infected, the animal is placed into quarantine for 10 days before euthanasia for human health reasons. Vaccination is the only effective way of preventing the disease.

Heartworm

Heartworm is a parasitic disease that affects numerous types of animals all throughout the world. It is spread through mosquito bites, where the mosquito spreads the parasitic larva to the mammal's bloodstream. Once the amount of larvae and worms in an animal's blood stream reaches a certain amount, the worms migrate towards the animal's heart. They can produce thousands of eggs per day and infest the right chambers of the heart, arteries in the lungs, as well as veins entering the liver and the heart. Coughing is the first sign of infection, which usually occurs about a year after contracting the parasite. Later signs include exhaustion, fainting, weakness, coughing up blood, difficulty breathing, and weight loss. Death is often the final outcome. Treatments are available for infected animals, but the best means of prevention is through heartworm preventive medicine (topically and orally administered) and yearly heartworm blood and fecal testing.

Pet Life

Pet Life

Phone: (727) 864-7538
Email: petlife@eckerd.edu

Facebook link

Zeta Lounge Renovations

Zeta Lounge

We recently opened the renovated Zeta Lounge featuring an enhanced kitchen area, flat screen TV with surround sound and ample study and meeting space along with new couches, chairs and barstool seating. Learn more.