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Diane Ferris
Director, International Education

Eckerd College
4200 54th Avenue South
St. Petersburg, FL 33711

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toll-free: (800) 456-9009
phone: (727) 864-8381 

International Education

International Education

Winter Term 2008

The below courses were offered during Winter Term 2008.

WTI-1G/CRN 6138 Language Immersion in Sicily

Professor Tom DiSalvo

Learn Italian while living in Sicily and discovering the multiple layers of civilization – Phoenician, Greek, Byzantine, Roman, Norman and Spanish – that make this Mediterranean island one of the most culturally intriguing destinations in all of Europe. The program is based in the capital city of Palermo, where daily language classes will take place. Afternoons and some weekends will be devoted to exploring the cultural heritage and natural beauty of the island, the remains of a Phoenician settlement (port and cemetery), and fascinating vestiges of Sicily’s history that you will experience while traveling around the island. Destinations include Monreal, Segesta, Cefalu, Selinunte, Agrigento, and Piazza Armerina. This Winter Term invites students with no knowledge of Italian as well as those who have studied or are studying Italian to be a part of the program. Grade is based on performance in the language class as well as knowledge of history and culture that will be presented throughout the course.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,900

WTI-6G/CRN 6140 Language Immersion in Spain

Professor Yanira Angulo-Cano

Take advantage of a unique opportunity to study and learn Spanish while living in and exploring one of Spain’s most historic and celebrated cities, Salamanca. Attend intensive classes (four hours daily) taught by the staff of Hispano Continental School. Exposure to and knowledge of Spanish history and culture through discussions and lectures. Students live with local Spanish families, which greatly facilitates the learning process. Excursions to nearby cities included. Students are tested upon arrival and placed in appropriate language level for classes. Evaluation by written test and oral interviews. Successful students will earn a full semester language credit.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $4,275

WTI-1E/CRN 6139 Micronesia: Biology, Geology & Culture: Pohnpei, Guam, Yap and Palau

Professor Nancy Smith

Visit the rich tropical diversity and culture of the Micronesian Islands in the western Pacific Ocean. Experience the origin and culture of the islands: Guam, Rota, Siapan, Yap, Palau, Majuro, and Truk. Visit the famous Truk lagoon with sunken WWII ships. Study important biological and geological principles operating in coral reef environments and small volcanic islands. Examine firsthand the different types of coral reefs, including fringing reefs, barrier reefs and atolls. Pre-departure readings, discussion and informal sessions on the significant features to be held. Evaluation for the course will be based on participation, discussion, journal, and a research paper to be completed upon return to campus.
Fulfills the Environmental Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $6,575

WTI-1/CRN 6148 Abiquiu: Ghost Ranch Conference Center

Ghost Ranch is a working ranch located in the uniquely beautiful high desert of northern New Mexico. Participate in a regional orientation program and enroll in one individual study project. Students travel on their own. Courses are offered in Abiquiu as well as in Santa Fe.

Courses include:

  • Black and White Landscape Photography A111; $2,565
  • Drawing and Painting Intensive A112; $2,365
  • Introduction to Silversmithing in the Southwest Tradition A113; $2,315; plus silver and stones purchase range from $150-$250
  • Southwest Pottery A114; $2,265
  • Wide Open Writing W111; $2,115
  • Service Learning in the Southwest C111; $2,185 **led by Eckerd staffmember, Jeannie Hunter
  • Outdoor Adventures 0111; $2,265
  • An Inner Journey: Still the Mind, Open your Heart H111; $2,065

Santa Fe Courses:

  • Cartooning and Contemporary Illustration S7A11a; $2,165
  • Museum Studies and Art History S7A11b; $2,115
  • Restorative Justice S7A11c; $2,065

Course descriptions are available in the Office of International Education. Prioritize three selections in 1-2-3 order; every effort will be made to confirm your first choice. Evaluation by project leaders. Costs do not include airfare. Costs are, however, inclusive of all fees except where noted and include round trip transportation from the Albuquerque Airport. Weekend and evening activities, dances, movies, and worship services are included.
Enrollment is limited by Ghost Ranch – apply early. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 2-24, 2008

WTI-3E/CRN 6143 Natural History of the Galapagos Islands & Ecuador

Professor Joel Thompson

A unique opportunity to explore and study one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world. We will camp in the Amazon rain forest, hike through thehighland cloud forest, and spend a week snorkeling and exploring the Galapagos Islands. While in Ecuador, students will have an opportunity to learn about tropical rain forest ecology, examine the history and culture of Ecuador, and study the unique features of the Galapagos Islands where Darwin developed his ideas on the origin of species. Participants must be in excellent physical condition. A service-learning component will be integrated into this class. Pre-departure readings and lectures will prepare us for the trip. Evaluation will be based on student participation, examinations, daily journals entries, and a final project.
Fulfills the Environmental Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-27, 2007
Approximate Cost: $4,650

WTI-2E/CRN 6147 Cultural and Natural Environments of the World: United States Virgin Islands

Professor Gregg Brooks

The Virgin Islands, generally consisting of mountainous islands, offer a wide variety of tropical terrestrial and marine environments including forests, mangrove to rocky coastlines, white sand beaches, and spectacular coral reefs. This course will explore all of these environments, but will focus on marine aspects as well as how humans interact with these environments. It will be an active trip that may at times be physically demanding, with many activities involving the water. The trip will be led by Professor Gregg Brooks. Dr. Brooks will be accompanied by Dr. Barry Devine, a local expert from the US Virgin Islands. Both of these professors have been performing scientific research in the Virgin Islands for many years.

The first phase of the program will be exploring the US Virgin Island of St. John, while in residence at VIERS (Virgin Island Environmental Research Station). The Virgin Islands National Park and Biosphere reserve make up 56% of the island and provide a great opportunity to observe the natural ecosystems as well as areas that have been impacted by the historical natives, plantation era (1700’s), and by modern human activities. Activities will be focused on terrestrial and coastal environments with hiking, kayaking, and snorkeling to investigate the link between the land and the sea.

The second phase of the trip will be aboard the 105 foot trimaran, "Cuan Law", sailing throughout the British Virgin Islands. The focus will transition to the marine environment with many opportunities for SCUBA diving (not required) and snorkeling, as well as kayaking and sailing. The many marine environments, seagrasses, algal flats, and mainly coral reefs will be explored in depth.Course expectations require active participation, including water activities, group projects dealing with aspects of the marine and/or terrestrial environments, and West Indian culture. Grades will be based on participation, a field journal, exams, and a written report/oral presentation on the group project.
Fulfills the Environmental Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,800

WTI-1A/CRN 7017 Encountering the Arts in Italy

Professor Marion Smith

Melded from Greek, Etruscan and Roman civilizations, Italian (Roman) culture has influenced Western thought, art, music, literature and civilization more than any other. The senses almost reel from exposure to history, architecture, art (Italy is the largest repository of a large percentage of the world’s greatest art). The creativity, craftsmanship, artistic energy that made Italy great is still in full evidence today. We will visit four cities: Rome, Siena, Florence and Venice, and in each of these cultural treasures we will make daily excursions to museums and monuments. We will also attend several live performances of music, including opera. Evaluation based upon reading, participation, discussion, four written assignments, and a daily journal.
Fulfills the Arts academic area. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,900

WTI-1S/CRN 7018 New York City - The United Nations: Terrorism, Peacekeeping and Human Rights

Professor Tony Brunello

How do we balance the need for security with the equally vital human need for freedom? Peace and human rights in the 21st Century are increasingly defined by the fear of global terrorism, war, poverty, environmental deterioration, and weapons of mass destruction. How effective is the United Nations in building trust and institutional relationships of cooperation in international relations to deal with these issues?

At the United Nations in New York City students will learn about the work of the UN through discussions with UN staff, delegates from the Member-States and representatives of non-governmental international organizations. The main topics of the course include the pivotal role of the UN in the areas of peacekeeping, terrorism, human rights, weapons proliferation and collective security. Students will study first-hand how the UN operates to help establish the balance between peace and security in global affairs. There will be meetings with the Missions of the permanent members of the Security Council, and with the Counter-Terrorism Committee and the Sanctions Committee. In addition, we will examine the role of the UN in the ongoing crisis in Iraq and the Middle East, as well as a number of issues related to human rights, the global environment and UN reform. The main goal is for the students to engage in discussions concerning how the UN facilitates the effort to lead the world toward a future of trust, collective security, peace, human rights and common decency.

Evaluation for the course will be based on completion of assigned readings,attendance at briefings in New York, a daily New York journal, and a finalpaper assessing the United Nations effectiveness and efforts in the subjects weare studying.
Fulfills Social Science academic area. Rolling admission.

Students are responsible for their own airfare.

Tentative Dates
January 3-18, 2008
Approximate Cost: $3,200

WTI-3G/CRN 6145 China: Its Business and Cultural Environments on the Eve of the Olympics

Professors Hong Gu and Morris Shapero

How should Americans be prepared for the rise of the next superpower in the 21st century? Come and study the Chinese economy and culture in Beijing and Shanghai on the eve of the Olympic Games, while exploring these two legendary cities and experiencing first-hand the rise of China. Beijing, the capital of China, is a city of history and culture, as well as modern wonders. With the countdown to the Olympics, Beijing is putting on a new look to meet the world. Shanghai, the port city in the southeast, has been the largest industrial and financial center in China since the early 20th century. Since the early 1990s, Shanghai has been leading the country like the head of a dragon in its economic development. Once the most developed city in Asia in the early 20th century, Shanghai is regaining her reputation as one of the most dynamic and advanced metropolises in the world.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $4,700

WTI-8G/CRN 6669 Japanese Language and Culture – Tokyo

Professor Eileen Mikals-Adachi

Learn Japanese while experiencing Tokyo, the gateway to Japanese culture, past and present. Mornings will be dedicated to language study, and afternoon and weekend activities will concentrate on exploration of the cultural heritage and contemporary trends of this fascinating nation. Cultural excursions will focus on studying the juxtaposition of old and new in the capital and in contemporary Japanese culture and will include visits to such contrasting landmarks as the ancient Meiji Shrine and the fashion capital of Japan – Shibuya, the Kabukiza theater in the Ginza, and the studios of Fuji TV in the trendy area of Odaiba, the Tsukiji fish market, and Akihabara electric town. Participation in such ancient arts as the tea ceremony and Japanese archery will be scheduled, as well as a visit to a hot spring and a Japanese home. Evaluation will be based on performance in the language class, overall participation, journal and term paper.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $6,200

WTI-2S/CRN 7267 Can Vietnam Become the Next "Asian Tiger?": The Financial Markets and Infrastructures in Singapore and Vietnam

Professor Bob Jozkowski

Singapore, one of the "Asian Tigers," has accomplished outstanding growth during the post World War II era. Many factors contribute to its becoming one of the wealthiest countries in the world. In Vietnam, the 1970s post war reunification saw the Vietnamese government confiscate privately owned land and forced citizens into collectivized agriculture. Today Vietnam is a "hot" emerging market that until recently had a smaller market capitalization than Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. Vietnam’s stock market index surged 145% last year.

In February 2007, the Singapore (stock) Exchange Limited and The Ho Chi Minh City Securities Trading Center announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance both capital markets.

Analysts have long studied the factors that may indicate which countries prosper and which ones falter. This Winter Term project will observe and consider whether Vietnam possesses the financial markets, infrastructure, national ethos, productive technologies and practices, etc. needed to prosper like its neighbor Singapore.

Participants will study national issues for both Singapore and Vietnam, including: political history, trade and foreign direct investment policies, and financial systems (stock market, bond market, banking system, and foreign exchange regime).

In addition to "financial" topics, students will explore cultural and historical sites to experience the flavor of local life.

Evaluation for the course will be based on completion of assigned readings, attendance at pre-trip briefings on the Eckerd College campus, and a final paper on students’ assessments of Singapore and Vietnam financial systems.
Fulfills Social Science academic area. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $6,850

WTI-1N/CRN 7268 Shark Biology and Research: Bahamas

Professor Bill Szelistowski

Study shark biology on campus for 3 weeks, followed by hands-on field experience working with sharks at Bimini Biological Field Station, Bahamas. On-campus lectures and discussions of reading from the scientific literature will focus on the biology of sharks and their relatives, including diversity, systematics, natural history, evolution, genetics, physiology, ecology, behavior, fisheries and management. Field work at Bimini will provide an opportunity to work with shark researchers and learn how to observe sharks in the field, capture and handle them using gill nets and baited lines, do diet analyses, and perform acoustical tracking. Evaluation will be based on tests and quizzes, an oral presentation, and performance in the field. Excellent swimming ability required.
Fulfills Natural Science academic area. Batch admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008

Travel Dates
January 23-28, 2008
Approximate Cost: $2,500

WTI-5G/CRN 6141 Sacred Byzantium

Professor Bruce Foltz

An immersion in one of the world’s greatest and most enduring civilizations, both as a historical presence and as living reality, through focusing upon the centrality of Byzantine religion and spirituality, not only to theology, but to philosophy, art, politics, and society. Beginning with a brief visit to Athens and traveling to visit Byzantine monasteries perched atop high rock pinnacles in Meteora, we will spend several days in Thessalonica, second city for both the Byzantine World and for Contemporary Greece. We will then spend several days in ancient Constantinople, present-day Istanbul, to visit the greatest monuments of Byzantine art and spirituality, including the Hagia Sophia and Chora Churches, the Hippodrome, the Great Walls, and the mysterious underground cisterns. The course will conclude in Egypt, initially in Coptic Cairo, built up from the original Byzantine city, and ending at St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mt. Sinai, the world’s oldest Christian monastery, built in the fifth century by the Byzantine emperor Justinian on the site of Moses’ encounter with the "burning bush," and featuring the greatest collection of iconography in the world. An ascent of Mt. Sinai on camelback will be a highpoint of the visit, along with the late-night experience of Byzantine chant in an ancient church lit only by beeswax candles. At many points, the Byzantine world-view will be related to its predecessors and successors (especially ancient Greek and Egyptian religions, as well as Islam) most notably at the Acropolis in Athens, in the juxtaposition of the Blue Mosque and the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and with the Great Pyramids of Giza, and students will in the process learn a good deal about ancient Greek and Egyptian religion, as well as Islam. Evaluation by class participation and choice of either an on-site journal, or a summative, reflective paper upon return.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $7,800

WTI-4G/CRN 6146 From Servant to Pilgrim and Back Again

Mona Bagasao

Travel to France and consider the social problems in a major urban setting that are replicated in virtually every other part of the world, including our own city, and actively participate in indigenous efforts to alleviate these problems. Join in community life and dialogue with students from around the world at Taize and read and discuss literature on the class themes. This class focuses on the integration of spiritual inner processes with the resulting outer actions of service in a Christian context. We will consider the issue of homelessness and poverty in Paris, France, participate in acts of service with intentional spiritual reflection surrounding our work, and examine and experience prayer and spiritual disciplines as they relate to living a life of justice. At the international contemplative community at Taize, we will interact with students from all over the globe, centering on "inner life and human solidarity." We spend a week in Paris, a week in Taize, then a second week in Paris - tracing the movement of service to contemplation to service that is a basic building unit of the Christian life. You do not have to be Christian to take this class, but you must be willing to embrace people for whom faith is their primary motivation. In addition to providing opportunity for service, will both draw upon and nurture the spiritual core of students and foster consideration of the role of faith/religion in developing critical awareness and response to global issues.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Batch admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $3,850

Service learning grants are available to offset the cost of the travel. See International Education for applications.

WTI-7G/CRN 6144 Service Learning in Nicaragua

Professor David Hastings

Have you ever wanted to go to one of the poorest countries in the western hemisphere, where most of the people live on the miniscule scraps of the rich? Now is your opportunity with a trip to Nicaragua where we will volunteer alongside ProNica, a non-profit organization based out of St. Petersburg. We will visit and actively participate in their pre-established development aid projects to alleviate Nicaragua’s struggle after 25 years of dictatorship, revolutionary and civil war. We will see how the election of Daniel Ortega, a leader in the Sandinista revolution 25 years ago, is affecting the lives of Nicaraguans. Will free health care and education change things for the better?

We will start with a 4 to 5 day instruction period in Managua that will cover the gender relations, political history, and effects of globalization on the economy andtrade, as well as health care, agriculture, and education systems in Nicaragua. We will then travel around the country actively partaking in assistance projects relating to the subjects studied. While traveling, students will live in groups of two in the home of a "Nicaragüense". Upon our return, we will develop a newsletter documenting our experience. Evaluations based on participation and engagement, journal entries, a pre-trip exam, and a reflective project. Knowledge of Spanish preferred but not required.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $2,675

WTI-9G/CRN 7269 Intensive Spanish in Mexico

Professor Tony Melchor

Learn Spanish in Mexico and earn 1 semester of credit toward the Eckerd College language requirement or a Spanish minor or major. On the charming campus of the University of the Americas (UDLA), located in the beautiful colonial city of Puebla, Mexico (future site of the Eckerd College Latin American Study Center), Eckerd students will learn firsthand what it means to live in a different language, rather than just studying that language in a book. Students will be lodged in home-stays with local families and will enjoy a Spanish-language environment in the city and the university. They will have daily interactions with the friendly local townspeople and with other UDLA students, as well as visits to some of the most important cultural attractions in Latin America. For these students, the Spanish learned in the classroom will be only the beginning of an unforgettableeducational experience.There are no prerequisites for this course. Students will take a placement test to determine their appropriate starting level.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Batch admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $4,200

WTI-11G/CRN 7273 Poverty and Service in Kolkata, India

Professor Brian MacHarg

Travel to exotic and challenging Kolkata (Calcutta), India where we will explore issues of poverty, justice and international community service. We will meet with various Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working on social problems that are particularly acute in India – child poverty and gender inequality. We will visit and volunteer with various NGOs around the city that work with destitute children and poor women. We’ll also get time to explore Darjeeling a town in the foothills of the Himalayan Mountains as well as visit the important Buddhist pilgrimage site of Bodhgaya. We’ll also see cultural sites in Kolkata such as the Kali Temple, Victoria Memorial, and the world-famous Botanical Garden. Evaluation will be based on participation at site visits to NGOs as well as written reflective projects. Meets 1/3/08 prior to trip.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,700

WTI-10G/CRN 7270 French Language and Culture: Tours

Professor Christina Chabrier

The quaint, historic town of Tours extends a warm welcome as you advance your language skills and immerse yourself in French culture. Morning language instruction leaves ample opportunity for individual exploration of this city rich in art and architecture, with a pleasant mix of tradition and modernity. Because Tours offers easy access both to Paris and to the French countryside, you are free to find various weekend activities corresponding to your own preferences. In addition, weekend and weekday excursions with the group allow you to discover Tours itself, as well as some of the most renowned French chateaux and other sites typical of this region.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Batch admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $4,850

WTI-2N/CRN 7271 Germany: Science and Technology

Professor Holger Mauch

Germany has the largest population and the largest economy in central Europe and it has changed its face significantly in the past 18 years. Find connections between recent innovative German policies and environmental accomplishments and the rich tradition of German scientists and engineers. Most of the travel within Germany will be using Deutsche Bahn’s advanced, environmentally friendly railway system. Learn about the history of science and technology in a guided, multi-day visit to the world famous "Deutsches Museum München." We will trace the mythos of German engineering in Stuttgart, including a factory visit to an automobile plant. The "Grüne Woche" agricultural fair will give us an impression of German and European foods. Also, enjoy the natural beauty of the Black Forest Mountains in winter time. In Berlin, find out how the reunification process merged societies that have been separated by the Iron curtain for decades.
Fulfills Natural Science academic area. Batch admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,100

WTI-2A/CRN 7272 A Journey through pre-Columbian Peru

Professor Brian Ransom

Experience and explore the fascinating history, artwork and ruins of the peoples who inhabited pre-Colombian South America in a journey which will traverse the full expanse of Peru. In Lima, we will visit the Gold Amano, Erotic and Anthro-pological museums. We will travel south to the ruins of Paracas, then fly over the spectacular Nazca lines. From Nazca we climb deep into the Andes to the flamboyant international city of Cuzco and the ruins of Machu Pichu. Heading to the Peruvian North Coast, site of some of the oldest ruins and richest caches of Moche ceramics in South America, we will tour the newly discovered tombs of Sipan, then travel down the coast to the scenic ruins of Chan Chan, finishing our tour. Evaluation will be based on participation in activities and discussions, and the successful completion of a travel journal which includes reports and comments from each site.
Fulfills Arts academic area. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $5,300

WTI-12G/CRN 7276 Service Learning in Rajasthan, India

Professor Olivier Debure

Always seen India through the Bollywood leans? Come join us in experiencing the true life in India through volunteering and living the difficult and ever so challenging life of the locals of a small village in the state of Rajasthan.

We will begin with a 3 day stay in Mumbai where we will experience first hand the city life and the influences of Islam and Hindu religions. We will learn about the current economic conditions of the country, the influence of art and history in modern and former India, and the status of women in new age India. We will then migrate to a village close to Jaipur in the northwestern state of Rajasthan where we will live the life of the locals by participating in their day to day activities and also helping them with the small scale industries. We will help in the local school system and develop health programs for the awareness of Aids and also Population control. Our last leg of the journey will include a two day stay in a palace where we will experience both the Moghul Life of the rulers of Rahasthan and their culture. In addition, we will be accompanied by an Eckerd College student from India who will introduce us to the real life in her country. Evaluations will be based on participations in the volunteer programs participation in reflection and group discussions, an interview report, and a reflection paper on what you did and learned.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $3,725

WTI-3A/CRN 7274 The Fine and Lively Arts in London and Paris

Professor Suzan Harrison

From the Elgin marbles at the British Museum to Turner’s impressionist paintings at the Tate Gallery, from the poets’ corner at Westminster Abbey to the Whispering Gallery in the dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral, from the world famous Harrod’s department store to the Portobello and Petticoat Lane street markets, from the Royal Opera House to fringe theatre, London offers layer upon layer of artistic, architectural, and cultural riches. Our exploration of London will include all these sights and many more, as we visit museums and historical sites, attend theatrical and musical performances, and explore the city itself by double-decker bus, by boat down the River Thames, and on foot. Out home for the Winter Term will be the college’s London Study Centre at 35 Gower Street, a 225-year old Georgian townhouse in the heart of London’s Bloomsbury area, just blocks from the British Museum and the West End theatre district. A weekend trip to Paris will provide us an opportunity to tour the Musee D’Orsay and Musee Orangerie, climb the Eiffel Tower, marvel at the gothic beauty of Notre Dame, enjoy a pain au chocolate and café au lait at a café, and stroll down the Champs-Elysees. Students will be evaluated on a background research presentation, group discussion leadership and participation, daily journal entries, attendance, respect for the home, and contribution to a safe and supportive learning environment.
Fulfills the Arts academic area. Rolling admission and batch admission.

Students are responsible for airfare from their home to London.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $3,300

WTI-2G/CRN 6142 Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos: A Business and Multicultural Adventure

Professor Ed Grasso

Explore ancient civilizations and world class organizations on this adventure. The countries of Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos have exhibited high levels of economic growth, business development, and cultural changes over the last decade and are designated as the new Asian Tigers or the next four Mini Dragons. We will compare and contrast the management strategies and leadership styles of organizations in each country while exploring their historical and cultural treasures, and interacting with students and faculty at major universities.

In Thailand we will visit ancient temples in Bangkok, ride elephants at the Lampang training center and visit a hill tribe village near Chiang Mai. While in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam we will explore the Cu Chi Tunnels near Saigon, visit clothing manufacturers in Hoi An and walk the grounds of theForbidden Purple City in Hue, the former imperial capital of past Vietnamesedynasties. In the capital city of Hanoi we will visit Ho Chi Minh’s House, the Temple of Literature and enjoy "Roi Nuoc" a traditional water puppet show.While in Cambodia we will explore the more than 100 sacred temples of Angkor Wat built between the 9th and 13th centuries in honor of the Khmer kings. In Laos we will visit the ancient capital of Luang Prabang, a UNESCO World Heritage site, and view Luang Prabang’s temples, and venture out to theKuangsi waterfalls.

Evaluation will be based on group project, paper, journal and intercultural interactions. Open to all majors.
Fulfills the Global Perspective. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $7,000

WTI-1H/CRN 7275 Beyond Hollywood? The Sundance Film Festival

Professor Nathan Andersen

For the last several decades, independent film makers have played an important role in challenging the authority of the film industry represented by Hollywood, providing alternatives for viewers fed up with mainstream films aimed primarily at generating a profit. Paradoxically, however, the methods, techniques, and subject matter of films successful outside the mainstream are quickly incorporated within it. We will explore this paradox, focusing on the relation between mainstream and independent cinema in America since the 1960s. The class will culminate in a visit to the Sundance Film Festival, held in Park City, Utah, which is popularly touted as the most important American forum for independent film, but is sometimes criticized as merely another means for young film makers to enter Hollywood, or for Hollywood stars to schmooze and ski. Evaluations will be based on participation, a test of film history and terminology, a film review journal and a group project.
Fulfills the Humanities academic area. Rolling admission.

Tentative Dates
January 3-25, 2008
Approximate Cost: $3,150

Winter Term 2014

Winter Term 2014

Winter Term 2014 course information available in the 2014 Passport

London Study Centre

London Study Centre

The London Study Centre is the heart of the Eckerd College study abroad program. Since 1970, when Eckerd College leased a 200-year-old Georgian row house from the Bedford Estates, over 2,000 students have called the Centre home. Learn more.