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Diane Ferris
Director, International Education

Eckerd College
4200 54th Avenue South
St. Petersburg, FL 33711

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phone: (727) 864-8381 

International Education

International Education

Winter Term 2009

The below courses were offered during Winter Term 2009.

WTI-1G/CRN 6118 Language Immersion in Sicily

Professor Tom DiSalvo

Learn Italian while living in Sicily and discovering the multiple layers of civilization - Phoenician, Greek, Byzantine, Roman, Norman and Spanish - that make this Mediterranean island one of the most culturally intriguing destinations in all of Europe. The program is based in the capital city of Palermo, where daily language classes will take place. Afternoons and some weekends will be devoted to exploring the cultural heritage and natural beauty of the island, the remains of a Phoenician settlement (port and cemetery), and fascinating vestiges of Sicily's history that you will experience while traveling around the island. Destinations include Monreal, Segesta, Cefalu, Selinunte, Agrigento, and Piazza Armerina. This Winter Term invites students with no knowledge of Italian as well as those who have studied or are studying Italian to be a part of the program. Grade is based on performance in the language class as well as knowledge of history and culture that will be presented throughout the course.
Fulfills the Global Perspective
.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $6,200

WTI-2G/CRN 6122 Language Immersion in Spain

Professor Emilia Garofalo

Take advantage of a unique opportunity to study and learn Spanish while living in and exploring one of Spain's most historic and celebrated cities, Salamanca. Attend intensive classes (four hours daily) taught by the staff of Hispano Continental School. Exposure to and knowledge of Spanish history and culture through discussions and lectures. Students live with local Spanish families, which greatly facilitates the learning process. Excursions to nearby cities included. Students are tested upon arrival and placed in appropriate language level for classes. Evaluation by written test and oral interviews. Successful students will earn a full semester language credit. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $5,400

WTI-1E/CRN 6119 Natural History of the Galapagos Islands & Ecuador

Professor Nancy Smith

A unique opportunity to explore and study one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world. We will camp in the Amazon rain forest, hike through the highland cloud forest, and spend a week snorkeling and exploring the Galapagos Islands. While in Ecuador, students will have an opportunity to learn about tropical rain forest ecology, examine the history and culture of Ecuador, and study the unique features of the Galapagos Islands where Darwin developed his ideas on the origin of species. Participants must be in excellent physical condition. A service-learning component will be integrated into this class. Pre-departure readings and lectures will prepare us for the trip. Evaluation will be based on student participation, examinations, daily journals entries, and a final project. Fulfills the Environmental Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $5,750

WTI-1/CRN 6127 Abiquiu: Ghost Ranch Conference Center

Ghost Ranch is a working ranch located in the uniquely beautiful high desert of northern NewMexico. Participate in a regional orientation program and enroll in one individual study project. Students travel on their own. Courses are offered in Abiquiu as well as in Santa Fe.

Courses include:

  • Black and White Landscape Photography A111; $2,790
  • Painting Intensive A112; $2,340
  • Introduction to Silversmithing in the Southwest Tradition A113; $2,490; plus silver and stones for purchase, prices range from $200-400
  • Southwest Pottery A114; $2,390
  • Wide Open Writing W111; $2,240
  • Service Learning in the Southwest C111; $2,190 **led by Eckerd faculty member, Lora Reed - See additional course description under WTI-2S/CRN 7045 Service Learning/Leader Development.
  • Outdoor Adventures 0111; $2,390
  • An Inner Journey: Still the Mind, Open your Heart H111; $2,390

Santa Fe Courses:

  • Contemporary Illustration in a Cartooning Style S7A11a; $2,290
  • Museum Studies and Art History S7A11b; $2,230
  • Restorative Justice S7A11c; $2,190

Course descriptions are available in the Office of International Education.
Prioritize three selections in 1-2-3 order; every effort will be made to confirm your first choice. Evaluation by project leaders. Costs do not include airfare. Costs are, however, inclusive of all fees except where noted and include round trip transportation from the Albuquerque Airport. Weekend and evening activities, dances, movies, and worship services are included.
Enrollment is limited by Ghost Ranch - apply early
.

Tentative Dates:
January 2-23, 2009

WTI-1S/CRN 6565 Ancient Egypt

Professor Scott Burnett

This 17-day program explores the culture and ruins of ancient Egypt. Crawl through the Great Pyramid, visit the tombs of the pharaohs and sail down the Nile, while learning about the religious, social, political, and economic aspects of ancient Egyptian culture. Our itinerary spans the pyramids and museums around urban Cairo in northern Egypt, all the way down to the tranquil beauty of Aswan in the south. To begin our return journey to Cairo, we will sail northwards from Aswan for two days on a traditional felucca, before visiting the multitude of tombs and temples Luxor has to offer. Additional course topics include the exploration of Egypt, the importance of the Nile for resources, transport, and leisure, and the influence of neighboring cultures on Egypt. Assessment will be based on student participation, written assignments, discussions, a pre-departure site paper/presentation, and a personal journal. Fulfills the Social Relations Area Requirement.

Tentative Dates:
January 2-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $6,250

WTI-1A/CRN 6564 Media/Space in New York City

Professor Karen Pitcher

New York City serves as a major media center for the United States. Not only is the city home to many major broadcasting outlets, publishing houses, advertising agencies, and recording studios, but New York also serves as a unique type of 'media space'. The course is designed to look at the city as a medium in and of itself. The objective of the course is to give students first hand experiences with a variety of media industries, but will also ask students to examine how the city itself functions as a media form, through its architecture, and also serves as home to many forms of public media spaces (such as monuments and museums). Students will complete an on campus component which requires reading from a variety of theorists from media, city space, and public memory texts, and then putting that knowledge into practice as we explore the city itself through these lenses. Students will be required to do reading responses, a variety of in-the-field observations, activities and field trips with accompanying reflective papers on those experiences in a trip portfolio. No prerequisites are required for the course. Junior/senior standing preferred, along with instructor permission.
Fulfills the Arts Area Requirement.

Tentative Dates:
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $3,450

WTI-3G/CRN 6125 Chinese Language and Culture in Shanghai: A Ride on the Head of the Dragon

Professor Hong Gu

Study Chinese language at East China Normal University, Shanghai, while exploring this legendary port city and experiencing first hand the vitality of this dynamic economic power-house of the twenty first century. Situated in Southeast China, at the mouth of the Yangtze River and facing the Pacific Ocean, Shanghai has been leading the country like the head of a dragon. Once the most developed city in Asia in the early twentieth century, Shanghai is regaining her reputation as one of the most vibrant metropolises in the world. Shanghai is where the East meets the West, and their interaction has given the city its unique character, traditions, and colorfulness. This trip will include a weekend in Beijing. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $4,375

WTI-4G/CRN 7044 Discovering Italy: Iron Age to Roman Empire

Professor Heather Vincent

Learn about the history and material culture of Italy from the secrets of the Pre-Roman civilizations to the decadence of the later Empire. Investigate Etruscan "cities of the dead" in Tarquinia and Cerveteri. Visit the island of Sicily to explore the vast and mysterious "Valley of the Temples". Study the technological innovations of Roman baths, aqueducts, roads and sewer systems. Discover Pompeii and Herculaneum, cities frozen in time. Experience the daily life of the Roman elite by walking through Pompeiian villas, taverns, and brothels. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $5,400

WTI-5G/CRN 6121 Japanese Language and Culture - Tokyo

Professor Eileen Mikals-Adachi

Learn Japanese while experiencing Tokyo, the gateway to Japanese culture, past and present. Mornings will be dedicated to language study, and afternoon and weekend activities will concentrate on exploration of the cultural heritage and contemporary trends of this fascinating nation. Cultural excursions will focus on studying the juxtaposition of old and new in the capital and in contemporary Japanese culture and will include visits to such contrasting landmarks as the ancient Meiji Shrine and the fashion capital of Japan - Shibuya, the Kabukiza theater in the Ginza, and the studios of Fuji TV in the trendy area of Odaiba, the Tsukiji fish market, and Akihabara electric town. Participation in such ancient arts as the tea ceremony and Japanese archery will be scheduled, as well as a visit to a hot spring and a Japanese home. Evaluation will be based on performance in the language class, overall participation, journal and term paper.
Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $6,500

WTI-6G/CRN 6120 Sacred Byzantium

Professor Bruce Foltz

An immersion in one of the world's greatest and most enduring civilizations, both as a historical presence and as living reality, through focusing upon the centrality of Byzantine religion and spirituality, not only to theology, but to philosophy, art, politics, and society. Beginning with a brief visit to Athens and traveling to visit Byzantine monasteries perched atop high rock pinnacles in Meteora, we will spend several days in Thessalonica, second city for both the Byzantine World and for Contemporary Greece. We will then spend several days in ancient Constantinople, present-day Istanbul, to visit the greatest monuments of Byzantine art and spirituality, including the Hagia Sophia and Chora Churches, the Hippodrome, the Great Walls, and the mysterious underground cisterns. The course will conclude in Egypt, initially in Coptic Cairo, built up from the original Byzantine city, and ending at St. Catherine's Monastery on Mt. Sinai, the world's oldest Christian monastery, built in the fifth century by the Byzantine emperor Justinian on the site of Moses' encounter with the "burning bush," and featuring the greatest collection of iconography in the world. An ascent of Mt. Sinai on camelback will be a highpoint of the visit, along with the late-night experience of Byzantine chant in an ancient church lit only by beeswax candles. At many points, the Byzantine world-view will be related to its predecessors and successors (especially ancient Greek and Egyptian religions, as well as Islam) most notably at the Acropolis in Athens, in the juxtaposition of the Blue Mosque and the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, and with the Great Pyramids of Giza, and students will in the process learn a good deal about ancient Greek and Egyptian religion, as well as Islam. Evaluation by class participation and choice of either an on-site journal, or a summative, reflective paper upon return.
Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $7,450

WTI-7G/CRN 6124 Service Learning in Nicaragua

Professor David Hastings

Have you ever wanted to go to one of the poorest countries in the western hemisphere, where a typical day's wage won't buy even a gallon of gas? Now is your opportunity with a trip to Nicaragua where we will volunteer alongside ProNica, a non-profit organization based out of St. Petersburg. We will visit and actively participate in their established development aid projects to alleviate Nicaragua's struggle after 25 years of dictatorship, revolutionary and civil war. We will see how the election of Daniel Ortega, a leader in the Sandinista revolution 25 years ago, is affecting the lives of Nicaraguans. Will free health care and education change things for the better? We will start with a 4 to 5 day instruction period in Managua that will cover the gender relations, political history, and effects of globalization on the economy and trade, as well as health care, agriculture, and education systems in Nicaragua. We will then travel around the country actively partaking in assistance projects. Students will live in groups of two in the home of a "Nicaragüense". Evaluations based on participation and engagement, journal entries, a pre-trip exam, and a reflective project. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $2,675

WTI-2A/CRN 6691 The Fine and Lively Arts in London and Paris

Professor Joan Epstein

This course focuses on London's rich offerings in music, visual art, architecture, theater and dance, both those associated with the city's most splendid venues and the cultural mainstream and those presented in the city's many ethnic enclaves and avant garde hot spots. We shall hear opera at Covent Garden, chamber music at St. Martin in the Fields, and the wild works of Karlheinz Stockhausen at the Barbican. We shall take in a West End theatre production and programs of ethnic dance, tour the National Portrait Gallery, the Tate Modern, and private galleries displaying the latest trends as well as the British Museum with its many ancient treasures. Walking tours, visits to history museums, and presentations by resident experts will help to give content to what we experience within London's diverse arts scene. A three-day excursion to Paris to sample that city's artistic grandeur will round out the course.
Fulfills the Arts Area Requirement.
Costs do not include airfare, transport to/from London Study Centre, personal expenses and entertainment not within the program design.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $3,900

WTI-8G/CRN 6398 Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia: A Business and Multicultural Adventure

Professor Ed Grasso

Explore ancient civilizations and world class organizations on this adventure. The countries of Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia have exhibited high levels of economic growth, business development, and cultural changes over the last decade and are designated as the new Asian Tigers or the next Mini Dragons. We will compare and contrast the management strategies and leadership styles of organizations in each country while exploring their historical and cultural treasures, and interacting with students and faculty at major universities. In Thailand we will visit ancient temples in Bangkok, ride elephants at the Lampang training center and visit a hill tribe village near Chiang Mai. While in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam we will explore the Cu Chi Tunnels near Saigon, visit clothing manufacturers in Hoi An and walk the grounds of the Forbidden Purple City in Hue, the former imperial capital of past Vietnamese dynasties. In the capital city of Hanoi we will visit Ho Chi Minh's House, the Temple of Literature and enjoy "Roi Nuoc" a traditional water puppet show. While in Cambodia we will explore the more than 100 sacred temples of Angkor Wat built between the 9th and 13th centuries in honor of the Khmer kings. Evaluation will be based on group project, paper, journal and intercultural interactions. Open to all majors.
Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $7,800

WTI-1H/CRN 6694 Beyond Hollywood? The Sundance Film Festival

Professor Nathan Andersen

For the last several decades, independent film makers have played an important role in challenging the authority of the film industry represented by Hollywood, providing alternatives for viewers fed up with mainstream films aimed primarily at generating a profit. Paradoxically, however, the methods, techniques, and subject matter of films successful outside the mainstream are quickly incorporated within it. We will explore this paradox, focusing on the relation between mainstream and independent cinema in America since the 1960s. The class will culminate in a visit to the Sundance Film Festival, held in Park City, Utah, which is popularly touted as the most important American forum for independent film, but is sometimes criticized as merely another means for young film makers to enter Hollywood, or for Hollywood stars to schmooze and ski. Evaluations will be based on participation, a test of film history and terminology, a film review journal and a group project. Fulfills the Humanities academic area.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $3,500

WTI-2S/CRN 7045 Service Learning/Leader Development Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

Professor Lora Reed

This course explores various models of leadership (e.g., transformational, fifth level, servant leadership, etc.) as part of leader development. Followership and service learning are explored in the context of community. Self-management, emotional intelligence, personal and interpersonal development are examined as students complete 40 hours of service to children in Abiquiu, New Mexico. Organizational citizenship behaviors, organizational culture, and social responsibility are analyzed as part of sharing space and ideas at Ghost Ranch. The course entails development of an individual leadership plan, participation in group debriefing and individual reflection, journaling, and completion of self-evaluation as deliverables for course evaluation. See WTI-1/CRN 6127 Abiquiu: Ghost Ranch Conference Center for dates and costs.

WTI-9G/CRN 6689 Children's Issues in Cambodia

Professor Nancy Janus

Cambodia is a beautiful Southeast Asian country, forced to recreate itself following genocide by the Khmer Rouge beginning in 1975. At that time all educated people were executed, leaving a nation without teachers, doctors, lawyers, etc. It remains poor, dependent upon the good will of foreign governments, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and individual benefactors. Though born after the genocide, Cambodian children experience the impact of continuing poverty on education, health and labor. Nonetheless, the Cambodians are friendly, can-do people determined to move ahead. This course will introduce you to Cambodia's history, to its beauty, and to the many efforts to recreate its identity in the modern world. You will spend your winter term in Phnom Penh, the capitol, and in Siem Reap, home of the beautiful temples of Angkor Wat. You will work and play with children in schools and in orphanages. You will meet representatives of the government, NGOs, and other service organizations for children. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $4,150

WTI-10G/CRN 6690 Service and Justice in South Africa

Professor Brian MacHarg

Travel to beautiful and exotic Cape Town, South Africa where we will explore issues of justice and community service. We will meet with various Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working on social problems that are particularly acute in South Africa - AIDS, race relations and orphaned children. We will volunteer with the Amy Beihl Foundation, an agency working in areas of children's education and race relations. We will spend time working with children in classrooms and orphanages. We will also have time to explore Cape Town - one of the most beautiful cities on the continent of Africa. We will develop a report to share with the campus community upon our return. Evaluation will be based on participation at site visits to NGOs as well as a written reflective project. Meets January 3 prior to departure. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $4,600

WTI-2E/CRN 6126 Micronesia: Biology, Geology & Culture: Pohnpei, Guam, Yap and Palau

Professor Jeannine Lessmann

Experience the culture, natural history and ecology of Micronesia's diverse islands. These islands offer unique opportunities to study the ecology of coral reef communities, to understand the ecology and geology of the islands, and to study the culture and history of the Micronesian peoples, including indigenous, colonial, and post-colonial cultures. We will explore Micronesia by first-hand observation while hiking, snorkeling, SCUBA diving (if certified), sea kayaking, visiting historical and archeological sites, and participating in cultural activities. During the course, each student will be expected to read material that pertains directly to the places we are visiting and to be actively engaged in all activities. Following our travel, a course project will be required. Evaluation will be based on readings, academic work during the travel, and participation. This course fulfills the Environmental Perspective.

This course is open to science and non-science majors. Swimming ability is required and students are expected to take the Eckerd College swim test. SCUBA certification is not required for this course, but if you are certified, all SCUBA costs, except gear rental, are included (e.g. tanks, weights, dive permits). Students must be in excellent physical health to complete the physical activities.
Fulfills the Environmental Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $7,540

WTI-11G/CRN 6692 Service Learning in Malawi, Africa

Professor Erika Spohrer

Heard Bono's claim that "this moment in time will be remembered. . . for how we let an entire continent, Africa, burst into flames"? Want to do something about it? Join us for this Winter Term project, during which we will do service at the Little Field Home, an orphanage in Chigama Village, Malawi, Africa. We will spend most of our time at the Little Field Home, home to 67 local children. Little Field Home is in the process of a unique transition from orphanage to sustainable community, so our volunteer work will be far ranging; we will engage with the orphans, work with the micro-lending program, do local village profiling, do medical outreach (especially regarding HIV/AIDS), work on agriculture and irrigation, and do after-school enrichment, including art, photography, and tutoring members of the village. We will also live on-site at the orphanage, giving us an intimate understanding of its workings and culture. Fulfills the Global Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $5,600

WTI-3E/CRN 6123 Cultural and Natural Environments of the World: Bermuda

Professor Joel Thompson

Explore the many wonders of Bermuda and examine first hand the modern carbonate environments of the Islands of Bermuda. The Islands of Bermuda are located approximately 1000 km off the east coast of the United States in that part of the Western Atlantic known as the Sargasso Sea. It is bathed in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream and is the only atoll in the North Atlantic. Bermuda is a carbonate platform, capped with low relief islands, sitting on top of an ancient volcanic seamount formed along the mid-Atlantic Ridge system approximately 100 million years ago. Its shallow water platform is a "carbonate factory" that produces a diverse array of carbonate sedimentary environments and features formed by physical, chemical and biological processes. Bermuda is also known for it's rich biological diversity within both marine and terrestrial environments.

This course is designed to observe and study these processes in situ in the field in Bermuda. Students will come away with an understanding of the important geological and biological principles operating in modern carbonate environments and the culture and history of Bermuda. We will be staying and working out of the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) as our base of operation. Some diverse carbonate environments that we will explore include various reefs, their famous pink sand beaches, lagoons, mudflats, modern and ancient dunes, paleosols and various karst features, including caves.

The course will consist of (1) pre-trip meetings on campus that will include lectures, readings and discussions; (2) a 14-day experiential field program in Bermuda that includes diving and/or snorkeling; and (3) a wrap-up period on campus following our return from Bermuda. Evaluation will be based on active participation, input into discussions, journal, research paper or project, and an exam. Fulfills the Environmental Perspective. No prerequisites required.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $3,850

WTI-4E/CRN 7043 New Zealand: Field Studies of Marine Mammals

Professor Shannon Gowans

Dusky dolphins in New Zealand are routinely approached by people. This class studies the dolphin's behaviors in relation to dolphin watching and swim-with-dolphin programs. You will participate in on-going research including tracking dolphins from land boat surveys. The data you collect will be used to explore potential influences ecotourism has on these dolphins. Students will gain valuable skills in observation of wild animals, photo-identification, data collection and entry. In addition to dusky dolphins, you will observe sperm whales, Hector's dolphins, and New Zealand fur seals. We will explore environmental issues threatening New Zealand wildlife (especially marine wildlife), and local Maori culture. This course consists of participation in the field, plus lectures and discussions. Evaluation is based upon class participation, a written project, and examination on readings. This course is suitable for both science and non-science majors. Physical competency for swimming and hiking is required.
Fulfills the Environmental Perspective.

Tentative Dates
January 3-23, 2009
Approximate Cost: $7,450

Winter Term 2014

Winter Term 2014

Winter Term 2014 course information available in the 2014 Passport

London Study Centre

London Study Centre

The London Study Centre is the heart of the Eckerd College study abroad program. Since 1970, when Eckerd College leased a 200-year-old Georgian row house from the Bedford Estates, over 2,000 students have called the Centre home. Learn more.