Careers

A degree in Human Development leads to a wide array of career opportunities. Graduates from the Human Development program have been successful in gaining admission to graduate schools and in obtaining exciting and rewarding jobs. Our graduates have been able to secure jobs in counseling settings, government agencies, research settings, in the school system from secondary to collegiate levels, and much more.

Graduate School

A degree in Human Development leads to a wide array of career opportunities. Graduates from the Human Development program have been successful in gaining admission to graduate schools and in obtaining exciting and rewarding jobs.

A strong link exists between U.S. graduate education, the production of knowledge, and economic and social prosperity. The United States needs a cadre of highly skilled leaders and experts in a variety of fields to address current and future challenges. Increasingly, graduate school is where future professionals obtain the knowledge and skills needed to solve big, complex problems. But fundamentally, graduate education is about people.

The benefits of graduate education extend beyond the economic realm; graduate education also plays a central role in producing an educated citizenry that can promote and defend our democratic ideals. Scholars educated at the graduate level in such fields as science, mathematics, humanities, arts, and social sciences are critically important to our quality of life and the cultural and social fabric of society.

Our Human Development graduates have pursued a variety of advanced degrees at institutions all across the country. Here’s what just a few of our graduates have accomplished:

  • University of Alabama – Birmingham
    • Paige Lewis, ’08 | Masters of Education
  • Antioch University
    • Lindsey Bennett, ’08 | Masters of Education (Elementary)
  • Austin Peay State University
    • Julia Huddleston, ’02 | Masters in Health & Sports Administration
  • Barry University
    • Keisha Carter, ’09 | Masters in Social Work
  • Boston College
    • Cara Graham, ’01 | Masters in Social Work
  • CUNY: Brooklyn College
    • Lauren Ross, ’08 | Masters in School Psychology
  • Chicago School of Professional Psychology
    • Joanna Greiner, ’04 | Masters in School Psychology
  • University of Colorado – Boulder
    • Danielle Beem, ’07 | Juris Doctor
  • University of Florida
    • Elise Latsko, ’09 | Masters of Education (Elementary)
    • Becca Lanier, ’11 | Masters in Marriage and Family Counseling
  • University of Georgia
    • Amy Share, ’13 | Masters of Public Administration with a concentration in Nonprofit Administration
  • Lesley University
    • Kayla Esce, ’09 | Masters in Mental Health Counseling (Art Therapy specialization)
  • University of Massachusetts – Amherst
    • Kristen Torres ’12 | Masters in School Counseling
  • Northeastern University
    • Kristen Letourneau ’10 | Graduate Certificate in Non-Profit Administration
  • University of Pittsburgh
    • Monika Guincho, ’09 | Masters in Applied Developmental Psychology
  • University of South Carolina
    • Sarah Fehling, ’03 | Masters in Health Administration
  • University of South Florida
    • Brooke Moench, ’14 | Masters of Gerontology
    • Kali Thomas, ’06 | Ph.D. Gerontology
  • Tulane University
    • Ashley Schmidt, ’09 | Masters in Public Health (Tropical Medicine specialization)

[1] Council of Graduate Schools, Graduate Education and the Public Good (April 24, 2008)

Application Process

Career Services is available to assist you as you plan for graduate education, including help with the application process.

Letters of Recommendation for Graduate School

Ask three professors or related professionals who know you very well, have had you in class, conducted research with you, or supervised your internship to write a letter of recommendation. You should request the letters at least 3 weeks before your application due date and provide all relevant information. For all details, please follow the guidelines on the Letter of Recommendation Request form.