Special Academic Offerings

Special Academic Offerings include subjects in which Eckerd College offers coursework but does not offer a major or minor, descriptions of unique educational opportunities, and listings of courses in various categories for easy reference.

Arabic

Arabic is offered at the beginning and intermediate levels at Eckerd.

Visit the Arabic page for full details about the discipline.

Behavioral Sciences

BE 260M: Statistical Methods for the Sciences
Statistical methods used in the professional literature of the natural sciences. Univariate, bivariate, and inferential statistics. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and one of the following: BI100N, BI101N, BI111N, BI112N, MS101N, MS102N, CS143, CS143M, ES270N.

BE 320E: The Role of the Modern Zoo in the US & UK
In recent years, zoos and aquariums have been subjected to much criticism. However, it is believed that zoos play a vital role in education and conservation. Historically, the US and Europe have approached animal behavior very differently, and those differences are still reflected in modern approaches to zoo management. Students will examine local zoo facilities including an intensive program at Busch Gardens Tampa where students will work as zookeepers. While in London we will visit the world

BE 498: Comprehensive Exam

BE 499: Senior Thesis

Composition

COMPOSITION

Composition courses emphasize the ways different writing processes lead to successful learning and communication. All address the conventions of expository writing, audience awareness, critical thinking, standard English usage, documentation, and preparation of portfolios for competency evaluation.

The Writing Center, a service of the Writing Excellence Program, supplements composition courses and provides assistance to students regarding any writing task.



CO 121: Writing Processes
Introduction to writing processes: pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing. Development of a personal voice to express ideas and values. Journal, academic essays, proper use of resources, including documentation.

CO 122: Analytic and Persuasive Writing
Critical reading and analysis of texts, with attention to audience, organization, evidence, persuasion. Collegiate research report: research questions, writing from sources, presenting evidence logically.

CO 200E: Writing the Environment
Investigation and practice of some of the many ways that people write about the environment, including the personal essay, advocacy writing, environmental journalism, environmental history, and scientific writing.

CO 201: Writing in the Garden
In this service-learning course, the garden will be our teacher and classroom - and the subject of our writing. In turn, we will use the garden to teach and mentor local elementary school students.

CO 202: Writing for Social Change
Students will develop their ability to recognize and analyze examples of advocacy writing. Students will also work with a nonprofit organization throughout the semester and create effective, thoughtful, and useful pieces of advocacy writing for that nonprofit.

CO 328: Research Writing and Technology
An advanced writing and research-intensive workshop. Students research their own field of study, refine documentation ability, explore web 2.0 technologies in the research process, utilize revision, create documents that meet scholarly composition standards. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

Creative Arts

CR 141A: Introduction to the Arts
History of music, literature, the visual arts, architecture, dance, and film correlated with the history of Western civilization for a deeper understanding and appreciation of the arts of the Western world.

CR 203A: Aesthetics East and West
Compare several art forms of the East and West, looking at what distinguishes art and what social and economic uses it serves in different cultures. Visits to museums and performances.

CR1 305: Resident Advisor Internship
A year-long course for Resident Advisers beginning in autumn term. Communication, paraprofessional counseling, crisis intervention, conflict resolution, leadership training.

CR2 305: Resident Advisor Internship
Continuation of the Resident Advisor Internship. Two semesters required for one course credit. Prerequisite: CR1 305.

CR 499: Senior Project

Directed Study

DIRECTED STUDY COURSES

Certain courses have been approved for credit by directed study. In directed study, the student works independently using an approved faculty-designed syllabus. Copies of directed study syllabi are available in the registrar's office. The following courses are available in a directed study format:

    AM 307H Rebels with a Cause
    AM 308H Becoming Visible: Sex, Gender, Amer Culture
    AM 401 Integrating American Studies
    CW 1/2 300A Internship with The Current
    CW 404 Web Journalism
    HI 321H Women in America
    HI 334H African-American History I
    HI 347H Recent American Hist: Historian's View
    LI 221H American Literature I
    LI 350H Modern American Novel
    MN 312S Women and Leadership
    MN 351E Technology, Society, and the Environment
    MN 406S Non-profit Management
    MN 411 Social Entrepreneurship
    PO 350S Florida Politics
    SP 401 Spanish Literature: Modern Novel
    WG 410 Research Seminar: Women & Gender Studies


Engineering

ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE DUAL DEGREE

The engineering and applied science program is designed for students who wish to combine a broad, values-oriented knowledge base with one of many fields of engineering or applied science. Students may pursue a career in applied science or one of many engineering disciplines including electrical, civil, chemical, industrial, aerospace, textile, nuclear, biomedical, or systems engineering. Students complete all requirements for majors at both institutions.

The courses taken at Eckerd College during the first three years are typically:

I. Pre-engineering core:

  • Math: Calculus I, II, and III, Differential Equations
  • Physics: Fundamental Physics I and II and Modern Physics
  • Chemistry: General Chemistry I and II
  • Computing: Introduction to Computer Science
II. Eckerd All-College Requirements:
  • Western Heritage in Global Context I and II
  • Foreign Language (two semesters)
  • Academic Areas (1 course from the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences respectively)
  • Perspectives: (2 courses; Global and Environmental)
  • A Writing Portfolio
III. Courses toward completing the Eckerd College RequirementsHere is a possible sequence of courses:

Freshman Year

    Calculus I & II
    Physics I & II
    Western Heritage I & II
    Foreign Language I & II

Sophomore Year

    Calculus III
    Differential Equations
    Modern Physics
    Introduction to Computer Science
    Global Perspective
    Environmental Perspective
    Humanities Area course
    Major Course Requirement
Junior Year
    Arts Area course
    Social Science Area course
    Four Major Course Requirements
It is important that the student be qualified to begin the freshman year with Calculus I and either Chemistry I or Physics I in order to complete the Eckerd College portion of the program in three years.

Upon successful completion of the three-year portion of the program (requirements of grade point average vary somewhat) and recommendation of Eckerd College, a student is admitted to an engineering college, where the dual-degree requirements may normally be completed in two years. The student is then awarded degrees from both Eckerd College and the engineering school.

The program is designed for an academically qualified student who is willing to work hard. While difficult, completing the program in five years is by no means impossible. Many students have done so and are practicing engineers today. The keys to success are being well-qualified on entering, making timely decisions on Eckerd College major and cooperating university, and obtaining early advice from the Program Coordinator.

Due to the sequential prerequisite requirements, it is vital for dual degree candidates to obtain advisement early in their careers at Eckerd College. Students who wish to pursue a dual-degree program should consult with one of the advisors as early as possible.

Environmental Perspectives

ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE COURSES

Environmental perspective courses provide opportunities for students to address issues in the environmental realm in such a manner as to enhance their knowledge of the natural world and to make informed value judgements concerning the environmental consequences of personal and social actions. The Environmental perspective requirement must be met with an Eckerd College course.

    AM 314E Environment in American Thought
    AM 319E Environmental Film Colloquium
    AN 220E Cultural Geography
    AN 335E Cultural Ecology
    BII 230E Tropical Ecology in Costa Rica
    CO 200E Writing the Environment
    EA 316E Asian Environmental Issues
    ES 285E Waterbird Biology and Conservation
    ES 351E Influential Environmental Writers
    HD 208E Your Health and the Environment
    HI 212E The Atomic Environment
    HI 316E Empire and the Environment
    HI 325E Western Myth and the Environment
    HI 353E Environmental History
    HI 354E Environment History - Europe
    LI 106E Southern Literature and the Environment
    MN 351E Technology, Society and the Environment
    MS 230E U.S. Regional Natural History
    MU 326E American Musical Landscape
    NA 182E The Earth's Biodiversity
    NA 201E Ecosystems of Florida
    NA 244E Energy and the Environment
    NA 260E Ecology and the Environment
    PL 243E Environmental Ethics
    PL 300E Nature and the Contemplative Tradition
    PL 310E Ideas of Nature
    PO 202E Public Policymaking in America
    RE 350E Ecology, Chaos, and Sacred
    RE 351E A Culture of Science and Faith
    RE 381E Ecotheology
    RE 382E Asian Religions and Environment
    RE 383E Nature Religion


Ford Apprentice Scholars

FORD APPRENTICE SCHOLARS PROGRAM

The Ford Apprentice Scholar Program at Eckerd College, initiated by a grant from the Ford Foundation, provides opportunity for 20 selected Juniors each year to participate in a two year enhanced program designed to develop the skills and habits of professional scholars and to encourage them to consider college and university teaching as a career.

The students selected take two courses in the junior year, History of Ideas I and History of Ideas II, and do optional summer research. In the Senior year, they work closely with the Faculty Sponsors in an enhanced major and take a Senior Colloquium. Funds are available for summer and research support. The two Ford courses may be used to fulfill the Humanities academic area requirement and either the Global or Environmental perspective requirement.

FS 301: History of Ideas I
Major ideas from classical Greece through the Enlightenment that have shaped our intellectual heritage. Emphasis on origins of academic disciplines, sources of creativity, social and cultural factors, key individuals. Variety of learning methods. Prerequisite: Junior standing and selection as a Ford Scholar. The two course sequence (FS 301 and 302) fulfill either an E or G perspective and the humanities academic area requirement.

FS 302: History of Ideas II
Continuation of FS 301 covering nineteenth and twentieth centuries and culminating in a major project that draws on student's knowledge of history to address a significant intellectual problem in the future. Prerequisite: FS 301 and selection as a Ford Scholar. The two course sequence (FS 301 and 302) fulfill either an E or G perspective and the humanities academic area requirement.

FS1 410: Ford Scholars Senior Colloquium
Required of Seniors in the Ford Apprentice Scholars Program. Shared reflections on issues pertaining to research, teaching, and other aspects of teaching as a career. Participation in both fall and spring semesters for a total of one course credit.

FS2 410: Ford Scholars Senior Colloquium
Required of Seniors in the Ford Apprentice Scholars Program. Shared reflections on issues pertaining to research, teaching, and other aspects of teaching as a career. Participation in both fall and spring semesters for a total of one course credit. Prerequisite: FS1 410.

Foundations

A successful academic program involves a partnership between strong majors and a comprehensive general education (GE) program. Students are not only involved in their respective fields of study, but also broadly integrated in the college's GE program. The heart of the college's academic program is the GE curriculum that continues throughout the four years of a student's course of study. It begins with two courses in the freshman year entitled Human Experience: Then and Now and Human Experience: Selves and Others. The GE program continues with students in their sophomore and junior years wherein students select courses, one each from the four classic liberal arts academic areas of the Natural Sciences, Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Arts. In addition, in recognition of the importance of global and cross cultural issues and the challenges humans face in environmental sustainability, students take one course designated as a Global Perspective course and one course designated as an Environmental Perspective course. Finally, in the senior year each student completes the Quest for Meaning course, which focuses on constructive responses to some of the critical issues of our time.

FD 1: Leadership & Self Discovery
An optional freshman course held during winter term, the Leadership and Self-Discovery Program enables students to develop a better understanding of their own personal attributes and possibilities while improving their learning skills, life planning skills, and leadership skills. By permission of instructor only.

FD 125: Self-Discovery, Service, Success
Examine concepts relevant to understanding that one's freedom to choose affects the creation of a meaningful life. Through selected readings and personal evaluative instruments, learn how current choices have direct implications on the development of careers and self-concept.

FD1 126: Foundations in Applied Learning - 1st semester
Year-long course examining how metacognition enhances academic success, personal decision making, values identification, career choice and career planning. Executive functions, learning styles, and self-management skills will be reviewed and applied to current coursework. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD2 126: Foundations in Applied Learning - 2nd semester
Continuation of year-long course examining how metacognition enhances academic success, personal decision making, values identification, career choice and career planning. Executive functions, learning styles, and self-management skills will be reviewed and applied to current coursework. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD 2: Facilitating Leadership Development
This course allows selected LSDP participants to gain the experience of facilitating experiential leadership development activities for freshmen. They receive training and experience in planning and delivering the curriculum. They are role models and resources.

FD 210: Understanding Information
This course examines the larger concepts surrounding information and its role in shaping our culture. Through this lens, topics include all aspects of information in a global society: searching, evaluation, management, production, value, and ethics.

FD1 280: Peer Mentoring Internship - 1st semester
The year-long Peer Mentoring Internship class is designed to link upperclass and first year students to develop interpersonal communication and group leadership skills. Peer mentors are nominated by faculty and invited by permission of instructor only. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD2 280: Peer Mentoring Internship - 2nd semester
Continuation of the year-long Peer Mentoring Internship class designed to link upperclass and first year students to develop interpersonal communication and group leadership skills. Peer mentors are nominated by faculty and invited by permission of instructor only. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD1 380: Leadership in Peer Mentoring - 1st Semester
Leadership in Peer Mentoring is designed to further develop the leadership skills in students who have previously completed the Peer Mentor Internship. Lead peer mentors are invited by permission of instructor only. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD2 380: Leadership in Peer Mentoring - 2nd Semester
Leadership in Peer Mentoring is designed to further develop the leadership skills in students who have previously completed the Peer Mentor Internship. Lead peer mentors are invited by permission of instructor only. Two semesters required for one course credit.

FD 410: Imagining Justice
Senior capstone course attending to debates about the nature of justice and its relevance for social and personal issues, and deploying diverse disciplinary materials and methodologies to elicit deeper reflection on contemporary issues of importance.

Global Perspectives

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE COURSES

Global perspective courses provide an encounter with cultures and/or histories whose bases (philosophical, religious, ethical, aesthetic) or world views differ significantly from those of the Western European or North American tradition. Such a course will encourage students to view their own cultural traditions and assumptions in the larger context of the world's diversity. Given the inherent educational value of having cultural experiences in other parts of the world, which naturally encourage cultural comparisons with the student's own, a semester of study or winter term abroad, if so designated, may also satisfy the global perspective requirement. The Global perspective requirement must be met with an Eckerd College course.

    AN 201G Introduction to Anthropology
    AN 206G Cultural Anthropology
    AN 212G Mesoamerican Civilizations
    AN 283G Southeast Asian Area Studies
    AN 285G Latin American Area Studies
    AN 286G Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa
    AN 287G Caribbean Area Studies
    AS 301G Ancient Barbarians: Self and Other
    CN 208G Gender/Sexuality in Asian Literature
    CN 228G Chinese Martial Arts: Literature and Film
    CN 288G Chinese Popular Culture
    EA 201G East Asian Traditions
    EA 204G Japanese Popular Culture
    EA 310G Modern China
    EA 311G Modern Japan
    EA 312G History of Southeast Asia
    EA 313G Modern Korea
    FI 224G International Cinema: The World through Film
    FR 370G The Francophone World
    HD 216G Global Children's Issues
    HI 218G Modern Middle East
    HI 232G World History to Columbus
    HI 233G Global History in the Modern World
    HI 234G Twentieth Century World History
    HI 324G Native American History
    HI 360G Modern Africa
    HI 372G World War II
    INI 389G British Seminar
    JA 207G Japanese Culture: Supernatural
    JA 307G Modern Japanese Literature: Self & Society
    LI 244G Postcolonial Literature
    LI 314G Caribbean Literature and Film
    MU 356G World Music
    PL 103G Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
    PL 303G Individual/Society - Chinese Thought
    PL 349G Native American Thought
    PO 103G Introduction to International Relations
    PO 104G Introduction to Comparative Politics
    PO 211G Inter-American Relations
    PO 231G East Asian Comparative Politics
    PO 232G The Pacific Century
    PO 263G North African Politics
    PO 311G Latin American Politics
    PO 316G Women and Politics Worldwide
    PO 352G The Globalization Debate
    PO 362G MidEast Conflicts and Wars
    PO 363G Middle East Political Economy
    RE 105G Religion in Global History
    RE 219G Hindu Traditions
    RE 220G Buddhist Traditions
    RE 230G Yogis, Mystics, Shamans
    RE 334G: Gender, Activism, and Religion
    RE 240G Non-Western Religion
    RE 325G Regional Topics in Buddhism
    RE 356G Asian Religions and Warfare
    RU 282G Russian Society Through Cinema
    SO 280G Time and Temporal Systems


Greek

GK 101: Introduction to Ancient Greek I
Introduction to classical Greek. Master grammatical constructions and vocabulary in order to read original Greek texts, both poetry and prose, to include: Homer, Plato, Euripides, and the New Testament.

GK 102: Introduction to Ancient Greek II
Introduction to classical Greek. Master grammatical constructions and vocabulary in order to read original Greek texts, both poetry and prose, to include: Homer, Plato, Euripides, and the New Testament. Prerequisite: GK 101.

GK 201: Intermediate Greek I: Prose
This course provides an introduction to classical Greek prose literature. Read Herodotus, Plato, Aristotle, and other great authors in the original language with attention to the history and socio-political context of the works. Prerequisite: GK 102.

GK 202: Intermediate Greek II: Poetry
This course provides an introduction to Greek poetry. Read Homer, Euripides, Menander, and other great authors in the original language with attention to genre, style, and historical context. Prerequisite: GK 102.

GK 210: Major Authors
Focuses on one or two important authors, offering students an in-depth reading experience coupled with discussion of historical context and related topics. Prerequisite: GK 202.

GK 310: Major Authors
Focuses on one or two important authors, offering students an in-depth reading experience coupled with discussion of historical context and related topics. Students will conduct independent research projects. Prerequisite: GK 202.

Honors Program

Designed for students who love to push themselves, our Honors Program groups talented students in special sections of our Autumn Term and first-year Human Experience courses. Read more about the Honors Program.

Human Experience

Human Experience is a two-course sequence all new students take their first year at Eckerd. Learn more about Human Experience at Eckerd.

International Education

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

LONDON COURSE OFFERINGS

The Eckerd College London Study Centre is a centrally located 225-year-old Georgian row house. The program is led by a different Eckerd College faculty member each semester, who lives at the centre with the students.

AHI 221A Art History: British Painting 1760-1960
Hogarth, Reynolds, Stubbs and Turner studied in depth. Collections of George III, Sir John Soane, Duke of Wellington and other connoisseurs of the period discussed. Visits to museums and galleries.

INI 389G British Seminar
Required for students in the London term. The historical, institutional and contemporary issues of Britain, with particular attention to London. Visit experts in various fields, excursions and readings to develop an understanding of Britain today.

LII 126H London in Literature
A study of major authors who incorporate London into their works, such as Shakespeare, Dr. Johnson, Dickens, Blake, Conrad and T.S. Eliot. Readings supplemented by films, possibly a play, and walks in associated areas of London.

POI 301S Introduction to Contemporary British Politics
Provides an understanding of British political institutions and insight into the main political debates facing Britain, including the media, the conflict in Northern Ireland and issues of race and gender. Discuss current political developments as they happen.

THI 365A Theatre in London
London theatre, including backstage tours and guest lectures, covering drama from classical to modern. For students with a general interest in theatre, of whatever major.

OTHER OPPORTUNITIES

Eckerd College cooperates with several institutions and agencies to provide students with opportunities in other overseas locations.

In addition to its semester offerings in London, Eckerd College regularly sponsors semester programs at its Latin America Study Center and at Xiamen University in China.

The Latin America Study Center focuses on the Andean Region of South America at a site of the faculty director's choosing.

At the China Study Center students enroll in a Chinese language course and courses in the areas of history, religion and culture, and economics.

ISEP (International Student Exchange Program)
Opportunities to study overseas for a semester or year at over 100 institutions throughout the world. Fees are aid to Eckerd College, and all scholarships, loans and grants, with the exception of work study, apply as if on campus.

France
Semester at the University of La Rochelle. Courses taught in French in a variety of disciplines. Summer, semester and academic year programs in Aix-en-Provence and Avignon through the Institute for American Universities. Instruction in English and French in the humanities, arts and social sciences.

Hong Kong
Semester at Hong Kong Baptist University. Full range of courses. All majors. Instruction in English. No language prerequisite.

Japan
Full-year or semester exchange opportunities at Kansai Gaidai (Osaka) or Nanzan University (Nagoya). Instruction in English. Focus on Japanese and Asian area studies.

Korea
Semester or full-year at Ewha Womans University (Soeul). Wide range of courses. Instruction in English. No language prerequisite.

England
Full-year exchanges with the University of Plymouth, England. Opportunities especially for science, computer science, and social science majors.

Globalinks
Semester, year-long and short term programs at the universities in Australia, New Zealand and Tasmania. This program is designed to assist students with admissions, accommodation arrangements, and travel opportunities.

Arcadia University
Summer, semester and year-long programs in 13 courtries ina wide variety of disciplines. Some sites offer i
ntensive language instruction.

Butler University
Summer, semester, and full year programs in 15 countries in a wide variety of disciplines. Some sites offer intensive language instruction.

CIEE (Council on International Educational Exchange)
Summer, semester, and full year programs in 30 countries in a wide variety of disciplines: Some sites offer intensive language instruction.

ICADS (Institute for Central American Development Studies)
Semester program in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Belize for students concerned about social change and justice issues. Combines academic programs with opportunities for community projects and research. Academic foci: human rights, women's issues, environmental studies, agriculture, public health, education, wildlife conservation, and economic development. Two semesters of college Spanish recommended.

International Partnership for Service Learning
Semester, full-year or summer programs that integrate academic study and community service in the Czech Republic, Ecuador, England, France, India, Israel, Jamaica, Mexico, the Philippines, Scotland, and South Dakota (with native Americans). Disciplines include history, political science, language, literature, sociology, economics and anthropology. Service opportunities include: teaching/tutoring; working in health care with the physically or emotionally handicapped, recreation, and community development projects.

Sea Semester
Semester program for students combining the worlds of science and the humanities with a unique experience at sea. Courses include maritime studies (history, literature, contemporary issues), nautical science (sailing theory, navigation, ship's systems), and oceanography (marine biology, physical and chemical oceanography). No sailing experience is necessary. Junior standing recommended.

Marine Language Scholarship Exchange with University of Las Palmas, Canary Islands, and University of La Rochelle, France
Courses in marine science and biology are taught in French or Spanish.

Information on all of the above is available for the International Education Office and Off-Campus Programs.


IAU 999: Institute for American Univ Co

International Education and Off-Campus Programs

At Eckerd College we believe that an international experience is an essential part of a liberal and liberating education. Learn more about International Education at Eckerd.

Latin

LA 101: Introduction to Latin I
Master basic grammatical constructions and develop vocabulary in order to read Latin authors in their original language. English word derivation heavily stressed.

LA 102: Introduction to Latin II
Master basic grammatical constructions and develop vocabulary in order to read Latin authors in their original language. Introduction to Cicero, Caesar, Ovid, and more. Prerequisite: LA 101, or high school Latin equivalent.

LA 202: Intermediate Latin II
Read great authors of Latin poetry and prose: Catullus, Cicero, Vergil, Augustine, Ovid, and more. Learn about the authors? lives and historical context. LA 201 recommended, but not required.

LA 210: Major Authors
Focuses on one or two important authors, offering students an in-depth reading experience coupled with discussion of historical context and related topics. Prerequisite: LA 202 or instructor permission.

LA 310: Major Authors
Focuses on one or two important authors, offering students an in-depth reading experience coupled with discussion of historical context and related topics. Prerequisite: LA 202 or instructor permission.

Letters

LT 200H: Figures of Justice and Service
An examination of well known figures of service and justice such as Nelson Mandela, M.K. Gandhi, Aung San Suu Kyi, Jane Addams, Martin Luther King, Jr. and others. Site visits to local agencies and community service to explore contemporary issues in the context of these great writers.

LT 202: Service and the Urban Poor
An exploration of the relevant social issues in major urban areas via community service-learning. Site visits to local agencies and community service to explore contemporary issues related to the urban poor.

LT 206H: Themes in Ethics and Justice
Through engaging enduring and contemporary works and a week-long immersion experience at the historic Chautauqua Institution in New York, this spring-into-summer course explores some of the most important issues and questions facing humanity today. Reflective Service Learning course.

LT 498: Comprehensive Exams

LT 499: Senior Thesis

Natural Sciences

NA 120N: Air Pollution
The essential science of air pollution, including fundamental chemistry, meteorology, and biology, is presented in the context of the case studies across the world with special emphasis on Asia.

NA1 125N: Engineering a STEM Exhibit - 1st Semester
Students will explore ways the Maker-movement ethos could make quantitative sciences accessible while exploring two Maker-based technologies: 3d-printing and the Ardiuno. Open to Freshmen and Sophomores considering studying mathematics, computer science, chemistry, or physics. Two semesters required for one course credit.

NA2 125N: Engineering a STEM Exhibit - 2nd Semester
Students will explore ways the Maker-movement ethos could make quantitative sciences accessible while exploring two Maker-based technologies: 3d-printing and the Ardiuno. Open to Freshmen and Sophomores considering studying mathematics, computer science, chemistry, or physics. Two semesters required for one course credit.

NA 133N: Earth History
Geological and biological earth history beginning with our understanding of the evolution of the solar system and continuing through the advent of human history.

NA 160N: Science: At the Cutting Edge
Explore today's major scientific advancements in animal behavior, earth and space science, genetics, and new technologies. This course personalizes science by illustrating its influence in daily and future life.

NA 164N: Everglades: A Florida Treasure
This field-based course explores how the Everglades developed, what makes it unique, and what conservation efforts are underway to save it. We will explore through outdoor activities, short papers, readings, and in-class presentations.

NA 173N: Introduction to Environmental Science
Environmental science strives to comprehend the nature and extent of human influences on natural systems. This course explores the science behind environmental issues using a case study approach. Not open to science majors.

NA 180N: Weather
This course studies atmospheric science and weather prediction. Particular topics include composition and structure of the atmosphere, energy flow, and weather

NA 182E: The Earth's Biodiversity
An exploration of life on Earth to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the impact of humankind on its living resources.

NA 200N: Introduction to the Oceans
Introduces non-science major to oceans: formation, chemistry, creation of weather, climate, currents, waves, and tides, and the interaction between ocean processes and the abundant and varied ecosystems that live within the oceans' realms.

NA 201E: Ecosystems of Florida
Ecosystems of west-central Florida, including the marine, freshwater, lowland and upland systems; study the biological interaction occurring in the ecosystem of the Tampa Bay region.

NA 201N: The Marine Environment
Designed for non-science majors/minors. Emphasis on use of the scientific method to address issues in the marine environment that influence the lives of the students. Topics include global warming and the biology of the oceans.

NA 202N: Climate Change Science
An introduction to current climate change science, including past climate change, predictions of future change, environmental impacts, and societal and individual responses, solutions and adaptations.

NA 203N: Introduction to Aquaculture
Presents basic principles and practices of aquaculture from local, national and international perspectives, as well as legal and environmental considerations. Includes a hands-on component. Intended for non-science majors.

NA 205N: The Scientific Method
This course will examine how the scientific method works and how it can be applied to investigate questions that interest you. Find out how to ask hypothesis driven questions. Intended for non-majors.

NA 207N: Biology and the Game of Life
An interdisciplinary course focused on modeling biological entities such as cells and molecules on the computer and exploring the implications of computational modeling on the human race.

NA 209N: Survey of Astronomy
Introduction and study of planets, stars, galaxies, and celestial motion for non-science majors. Some night observing sessions and out-door activities.

NA 210N: Astrobiology: Life in the Universe
Examines stars, planets, and conditions for biological life. Topics include comet impacts, life in extreme environments, and searches for extraterrestrials. Some evening observing. Prerequisites: passing grades in a year of high school algebra and either high school chemistry or physics.

NA 212N: Marine Mammal Science
Explores the language and methodology of science, including biology, evolution, ecology, and conservation within the context of marine mammal science. Intended for non-science majors.

NA 217N: Evolving World-View Of Science
What distinguishes science as an investigatory tool and gives it such power? How does the universe as presented by modern science compare with religious and philosophical ideas? This course traces the development of scientific understanding.

NA 220N: Science of Drugs and Addiction
Presents the essential science, including fundamental chemistry, biology, and neuroscience, required to understand drugs' structure and function and mechanisms of addiction.

NA 244E: Energy And Environment
Options available to societies in producing energy, the consequences of each choice, and the different sets of values implicit in the choices.

NA 260E: Ecology and Environment
Relationships between organisms and their environments, including evolution, population and behavioral ecology, interspecific interactions, communities, and ecosystems. Application of ecological concepts to environmental issues. Not available for credit toward biology or marine science requirements.

NA 272N: Interdisciplinary Science
Explore a modern scientific world view from mathematical, biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Human roles and responsibilities within nature and the natural environment. Investigate interactions between science and society.

NA1 344: Scientific Inquiry Seminar - 1st semester
First semester of a year-long seminar exploring the nature of scientific discovery, researching student learning in the natural sciences, and making the transition from student to scientist. Prerequisites: transfer student intending on majoring in the natural sciences.

NA2 344: Scientific Inquiry Seminar - 2nd semester
Second semester of a year-long seminar exploring the nature of scientific discovery, researching student learning in the natural sciences, and making the transition from student to practicing scientist. Prerequisites: transfer student intending on majoring in the natural sciences and NA1 344.

NA 498: Comprehensive Examination

NA 499: Senior Thesis

Physical Education

PE 200: Coaching & Sports Performance
How motivational techniques can enhance performance on and off the field. A comprehensive review of the major trends in motivation, attentional focusing, goal setting, anxiety and arousal, relaxation techniques, and team building will be examined.

PE 321: Athletic Coaching
Social-psychological problems of coaching today, the role of sports, developing a philosophy of coaching. Sports programs from youth leagues to collegiate athletics. Teaching styles, training, sports psychology.

PE 499: Senior Project

Senior Capstone: Imagining Justice

In Imagining Justice we bring you back together with your Autumn Term class to reflect on how far you’ve come and grapple with the questions that will define the adult you’re becoming. Learn more about Imagining Justice at Eckerd.

Reserve Officer Training Corps

ROTC (RESERVE OFFICER'S TRAINING CORPS)

AEROSPACE STUDIES AIR FORCE ROTC

To become a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force through Air Force ROTC, students must complete the four-year program. So it is important to remember to enroll in AFROTC at the same time and in the same manner as you do for your first college courses. The program is designed to begin in the Fall of student?s freshman year.

General Military Course

The first two years of the Air Force ROTC four-year program, the General Military Course, consist of one hour of classroom work, two hours of leadership laboratory, and two hours of physical training each week. The General Military Course is an opportunity for students not on an Air Force ROTC scholarship to try out the program with no obligation. After completing General Military Course requirements, if you wish to compete for entry into the last two years of the program, the Professional Officer Course, you must do so under the requirements of the Professional Officer Course selection system. This system uses qualitative factors, such as grade point average, unit commander evaluation and aptitude test scores to determine if you have officer potential. After selection you must successfully complete a summer four-week field-training unit at an assigned Air Force base before entering the Professional Officer Course. And once you are enrolled in the Professional Officer Course, you must attend class three hours a week and participate in a weekly physical training and leadership laboratory.

Professional Officer Course

In the Professional Officer Course, you apply what you have learned in the General Military Course and at field-training units. And in Professional Officer Corps, you actually conduct the leadership laboratories and manage the unit?s cadet corps. Each unit has a cadet corps based on the Air Force organizational pattern of flight, squadron, group and wing. Professional Officer Course classes are small. Emphasis is placed on group discussions and cadet presentations. Classroom topics include management, communication skills and national defense policy. And once you have enrolled in the Professional Officer Course, you are enlisted in the Air Force Reserve and assigned to the Obligated Reserve Section. This entitles you to a monthly $300-$500 nontaxable subsistence allowance during the academic year.

Scholarships may be available for eligible applicants. Air Force ROTC can help you with the rising costs of college education with an array of full or partial scholarships that cover tuition and books and even provide extra spending money so you can concentrate on your studies instead of how to pay for them. Those interested in more information about scholarship criteria should contact the AFROTC department at USF.

Students interested in enrolling in the four-year program can begin registration procedures in the summer prior to their freshman year through the AFROTC office in CWY407 at USF before registering for the appropriate "AFR" course through university registration. Veterans, active-duty personnel and graduate students are encouraged to inquire about special accelerated programs designed for them. A three-year program may be offered for qualified students on a case-by-case basis. The AFROTC phone number is (813) 974-3367.

Eckerd College will award one Eckerd College course for the first two years (equivalent to four semester hours) and three course credits (equivalent to twelve semester hours) for the successful completion of the final two years.

ARMY RESERVE OFFICER'S TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)

The Department of Military Science and Leadership for Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) was established to select and prepare students (Cadets) to serve as Commissioned Officers in the Regular, National Guard and Army Reserve components of the United States Army. The curriculum
is designed to certify and develop the student's leadership potential and improve the student's planning, organizational, and managerial skills in order to lead and command troops at various levels of the Army.

Army ROTC training is divided into two phases, the basic course and the advanced course. Students with prior military service can be exempt from the basic course. Students with questions concerning placement and options should contact an Army ROTC cadre member for more information. Enrollment is open to qualified students at all levels, including graduate level students.

Army ROTC training provides scholarships, monthly pay stipends, free textbooks, uniforms and equipment. Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis in all academic majors. The scholarship pays full tuition and books ($1200). All contracted cadets receive a monthly pay stipend ranging from $300 in the freshman year to $500 in the senior year. All summer training courses, Leaders Training Course (LTC) and Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC), are also paid at approximately $700 plus meals and room. Additional skills training such as Airborne and Air Assault schools are available to both the Basic and Advanced Course Cadets, based on performance and merit.

Basic Course: Consists of the first and second year courses. This is one and a half hours of classroom instruction a week and two hours of leadership laboratory. Cadets incur no military commitment by participating in the basic course. If a Cadet misses a semester, he/she can opt to attend the LTC camp at Fort Knox during the summer for 28 days. This course accounts for those courses not completed. Two year scholarships are also available after graduation from the LTC.

Advanced Course: Consists of the third and fourth year military courses. These courses are open to contracted Cadets. Both year 3 and year 4 classes consist of three hours a week of classroom instruction plus Leadership Lab, physical fitness, and field training exercises. Cadets are required to attend LDAC at Fort Lewis Washington for thirty-three days during the summer. The advanced course is designed to prepare and evaluate contracted Cadets who desire to become Army Officers for duty in the Active, Guard, and Reserve Components as 2nd Lieutenant.

Opportunities: New commissioned Officers can be also guaranteed Reserve or National Guard duty. Prior to commissioning, Cadets will request to serve in one of sixteen special career fields ranging from Infantry, Medical, Aviation, Engineering, Law Enforcement, Logistics and Human Resources. Starting pay for a Lieutenant on active duty is in excess of $42,000. In four years as a Captain, one can even earn over $65,000 annually. Officers and their families will be assigned to serve at various bases in the United States and overseas around the world.

Requirements: Students who desire to contract and earn and commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army must pass an Army Physical (Medical), an Army Physical Fitness Test, height and weight requirements, and a background investigation. Also required are passing a 3-credit course in military history, passing swimming requirements, and maintaining a Cum GPA of 2.5 or higher. Cross-enrolled Cadets will take courses and training at the USF St. Petersburg Campus. Thursday Leadership Laboratory sessions are held in the Tampa Bay area. Shuttle service is also available from USF to and from those training areas.

For more information and scholarship enrollment, contact the Suncoast Battalion Army ROTC main office at (813) 974-0963 or visit the website:armyrotc.com/edu/univsouthfl.

Eckerd College will award one Eckerd College course credit (equivalent to four semester hours) for each course completed for two semesters for a total of four course credits (equivalent to sixteen semester hours) for the complete four year program.

MAR1 1001C: Leadership and Personal Development
Introduces to personal challenges and competencies critical to effective leadership; teaches personal development life skills relative to leadership, officership, and Army profession; focuses on gaining understanding of ROTC Program and its purpose in Army.

MAR2 1002C: Introduction to Tactical Leadership
Presents leadership basics (eg: setting direction, problem-solving, listening, briefs, giving feedback and use of effective writing skills); explores dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills and actions in context of practical hands-on exercises.

AFR1 1101: Foundations of U.S. Air Force
Introduction to the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) and the United States Air Force (USAF) including lessons in officership and professionalism as well as an introduction to communication. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. First semester of a four semester sequence. Four semesters required for one course credit.

AFR2 1120: Foundations of U.S. Air Force
Introduction to the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) and the United States Air Force (USAF) including lessons in officership and professionalism as well as an introduction to communication. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. Second semester of a four semester sequence. Four semesters required for one course credit.

MAR1 2101C: Innovative Team Leadership
Explores creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles. Develops knowledge of leadership values and attributes by understanding Army rank, structure, and duties. Broadens knowledge of land navigation and squadtactics.

MAR2 2102C: Foundations of Tactical Leadership
Examines challenges of leading tactical teams in complex current operating environment; highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling and operation orders; develops greater self-awareness, communication and team building skills.

AFR3 2130: History of Air & Space Power I
A study of air power from balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems in the Persian Gulf War. Emphasis is on the employment of air power in WWI and WWII and how it affected the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. Third semester of a four semester sequence. Four semesters required for one course credit.

AFR4 2140: History of Air & Space Power 2
Historical review of air power employment in military and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives. Emphasis is on the period from post WWII to present. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. Fourth semester of a four semester sequence. Four semesters required for one course credit.

MAR1 3201C: Adaptive Team Leadership
Challenges to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive team leadership skills as demands of the ROTC LDAC are presented. Uses challenging scenarios to develop self-awareness and critical thinking skills. Provides specific feedback on leadership abilities.

MAR2 3202C: Leadership in Changing Environments
Challenges to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as demands of ROTC Leader Development Assessment Course are presented. Develops self-awareness and critical thinking skills with challenging scenarios. Provides feedback on leader skills. Course content will change each semester.

AFR1 3220: Air Force Leadership & Management I
An integrated management course, emphasizing the individual as a manager in an Air Force environment. The individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communication, and group dynamics are covered to provide a foundation for the development of the junior officer's professional skills. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. First semester of a two semester sequence. Two semesters required for one course credit.

AFR2 3231: Air Force Leadership & Management II
A continuation of the study of Air Force advancement and leadership. Concentration is on advanced leadership topics, organizational and personal values, and military ethics. A minimum of 80 percent attendance is required for a passing grade. Second semester of a two semester sequence. Two semesters required for one course credit.

AFR 4201: National Security Forces I
A study of the Armed Forces as an integral element of society, with an emphasis on American civil-military relations and context in which U.S. defense policy is formulated and implemented. A minimum of 80 percent attendance in scheduled classes is required for a passing grade.

AFR 4211: National Security Forces II
A continuation of the study of the Armed Forces in contemporary American society. Concentration is on the requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; constraints on the national defense structure; strategic preparedness; national security policy; and military justice. A minimum of 80 percent attendance in scheduled classes is required for a passing grade.

MAR1 4301C: Developing Adaptive Leaders
Develops ability to plan, and assess complex operations, functioning as member of a staff; provides performance feedback to subordinates; gives opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow cadets; prepares in becoming Army officer.

MAR2 4302C: Leadership in a Complex World
Explores dynamics of leadership in complex situations of current military operations in current operating environment; examines differences in courtesies, military law, principles of war and rules of engagement in face of international terror and more.

Sea Semester

SEA SEMESTER

Sea Semester at Woods Hole provides an experiential opportunity for students to earn a semester of credit (4 Eckerd course equivalents) in an academic, scientific, and practical experience leading to an understanding of the sea. These interdisciplinary programs are sponsored by the Sea Education Association, Inc. (S.E.A.). Every SEA Semester begins with a shore component followed by an open ocean research cruise. Each program combines elements of oceanography, maritime history and culture, environmental studies, public policy, and nautical science.

A maximum of four courses is awarded for the successful completion of a semester program with grades of C- or better. Students from any major may apply and this satisfies the Environmental Perspective requirement.

For more information, contact the Office of International Education and Off Campus Programs. Sea Education Association, Inc. also offers a shorter summer program. Students interested in the summer program must apply directly to S.E.A. and should follow the normal procedure for pre-approval of transfer credit.

Statistics

STATISTICS

Credit will be given for only one of the statistics courses below.

MA 133M Statistics, An Introduction For description, see Mathematics.

SO 160M Statistical Methods For description, see Sociology.

BE 260M Statistical Methods for the Sciences For description, see Behavioral Sciences.

MN 260M Statistical Methods: Management and Economics For description, see Management.

PO 260M Political Science Research Methods For description, see Political Science.

PS 200/201M Statistics and Research Design I,II For description, see Psychology.